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Rural Institutions and Participation Service; Case Study

Lessons learned and Good Practice: Community-Based Organizations in Yemen






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    Provision of Services to the Livestock Sector: The Case of Animal Health 2004
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    Pressures for market liberalisation and privatisation have affected the provision of services to livestock keepers in most developing countries. Some services previously provided by governments have been reduced or totally withdrawn, while attempts have been made to encourage private sector provision in place of the government services.
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    REHABILITATION OF DEGRADED LANDS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: LESSONS FROM CASE STUDIES
    WORKSHOP ON STRENGTHENING REGIONAL ACTION – IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IPF/IFF PROPOSALS
    2004
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    Land degradation, defined as the temporary or permanent decline in the productive capacity of the land, threatens the lives of millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), especially those residing in rural areas. The area covers 13.9 million km2 or about 46 percent of the continent and can be broadly classified into three zones: (i) humid lands; (ii) sub-humid lands, and (iii) dry lands. 2. Land degradation affects all three zones to differing degrees. Key factors are agricultural expan sion, logging, firewood and charcoal production, mining, human settlements, infra-structural and related industrial developments. Overgrazing and uncontrolled fires add to problems, especially in sub-humid and dry lands zones. Poor government policies, inequitable distribution of benefits, market and policy failures, population growth, rural poverty and poor economies exacerbate conditions, particularly when they are combined with natural causes such as drought, fire by lightning, floods, and in sects and diseases.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The impact of HIV/AIDS on farmers knowledge of seed Case study of Chokwa District, Gaza Province, Mozambique
    Case study of Chokwa District, Gaza Province, Mozambique
    2004
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    HIV/AIDS has a negative impact on all the key factors that facilitate access to local and new knowledge around seed and seed management, including local capacity for seed conservation, access to labor and land. Women, the principal keepers of this knowledge are particularly vulnerable to these impacts. Based on fieldwork carried out in Chókwè District of Gaza Province, southern Mozambique, this study reveals that female-headed households have a significantly smaller area of cultivated land, plant fewer crops and have access to less family labor. These factors all relate to seed security, suggesting that female-headed households are less seed secure than maleheaded households. However, it is difficult to determine whether this is caused by poverty (femaleheaded households are likely to be poorer than male-headed households) or the impact of HIV/AIDS. Statistical analysis of the data collected suggests that HIV/AIDS affected households, especially those households car ing for orphans, experienced constraints in access to seed and seed information. These issues should be addressed urgently before the erosion of local knowledge undermines seed security and thereby food security. New agricultural projects, especially those relating to seed, should be formulated to target and relieve some of the farm level constraints faced by HIV/AIDS affected households, especially those households caring for orphans and femaleheaded households.

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