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Children seeking to harness the treasures of the oceans: fisheries management

An educational guide using a multidisciplinary approach to help children learn about integrated fisheries management in the South Western Indian Ocean region










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    Book (series)
    Environmental management and environmental impact assessment in aquaculture: Training Workshop for aquaculture managers. Entebbe, Uganda
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The overall objective of the SmartFish programme is to contribute to an increased level of social, economic and environmental development and deeper regional integration in the Eastern-Southern Africa and Indian Ocean Region (ESA-IO), through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The programme is funded by the European Union under the 10th European Development Fund and is implemented under the overall responsibility of the Indian Ocean Commission. Within the framework of SmartFish Result 5, Output 5M3.1, improved Environmental Management and Environmental Impact Assessment in Aquaculture (EIAA) was identified as a means by which sustainable benefits from aquaculture can be ensured. The regional training workshop was organized for SmartFish beneficiary countries with the objective of enabling them to improve country application and compliance of environmental impact assessment and environmental management of aquaculture, which would in turn help them foster sustainable de velopment. All SmartFish member countries participated in the organization of the workshop, from the assessment of training needs, to the design of the training programme, through to the training itself. Based on the findings from the initial needs assessment exercise, the workshop targeted national aquaculture managers. Findings from the needs assessment suggested focusing on improving practical knowledge and skills to address the following topics:  Aquaculture inputs and resources;  Aquacult ure outputs and impacts;  Why undertake environmental management;  Site selection and estimating capacity;  Modeling aquaculture impact;  Environmental regulations and their application;  EIAA components and process;  Environmental Management planning;  Environmental monitoring;  Strategic Environmental Assessment. The training sessions involved active discussions and practical exercises, which included field tours and case studies. In the case studies, participants evaluated pond and ca ge based aquaculture investments within the context of EIAA. They took into account the technical aspects, as well as the socio-economic and ecosystem requirements and impacts likely to arise from aquaculture. The evaluation of case studies followed steps based on recommended best practices from EIAA and Environmental Management Procedures (EMP). 5 The steps below show how participants undertook the review of their case studies:  Evaluation of the business plan;  EIAA screening process;  Ide ntification of main issues likely to arise, including identification of key stakeholders, stakeholder consultation exercises (done during field visit) and risk analysis of the main issues;  Identification of data requirements for analysis, evaluation and monitoring;  Identification of mitigation measures;  Presentation of findings that were outlined as EIAA and EMP to the departments of Environment and Aquaculture1 for final evaluation, approval and licensing. At the end of the workshop, part icipants expressed the value of working together with all relevant stakeholders. Aquaculture as an enterprise is cross-cutting and EIAA and EMPs cannot be implemented effectively by primary departments alone. Moreover, participants were able to identify the key issues in their respective countries, and the appropriate practical steps needed to be put in place, which would enable them to become more effective in EIAA considering both their national and local conditions. The following were identif ied by participants as being the gaps for which additional support would be required in order to improve levels of effective implementation of EIAA in the region:  Specialized training that targets managers (both in aquaculture and environmental institutions), practitioners and the general public, focusing on building skills and improving levels of public awareness.  Building the capacity of the various public institutions and the private sector, through building Public-Private-Partnerships, i n order to implement EIAA and better manage the general environmental issues of aquaculture. The following proposals were put forward: the development and production of user manuals for the different audiences; the provision of field and laboratory equipment; undertaking Strategic Environmental Assessments; setting up specialized EIAA units within departments; and, establishing effective functional linkages between key departments, notably the National Environmental Management Agencies and Fishe ries aquaculture institutions. Information management systems should also be looked at.  Development and/or improvement of general and specific national policies, regulations, strategies and guidelines, including their implementation.  Adoption of environmentally friendly systems and practices at all times.
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    Book (series)
    Aquaculture needs assessment mission report. Nairobi, Kenya
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The Aquaculture Needs Assessment of Kenya was jointly organized by the Government of Kenya and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), under the framework of the project GCP/RAF/466/EC “Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy for the Eastern and Southern Africa and Indian Ocean Region”, otherwise known as SmartFish. SmartFish is funded by the European Union (EU) through the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) and co-implemented by the FAO. The needs assessment is one of the activities being implemented under Result 5M3.1 Sustainable Aquaculture Development Promotion, which responds to African countries’ desire to contribute their efforts to transform aquaculture from a non-viable, subsistence and public sector driven economy, to a resourceful, vibrant, private sector led sustainable enterprise. The needs assessment was carried out at specific sites in the western part of the country. The study involved: a desk review for the purpose of having background inf ormation about the sector; the site selection of study areas for the mission; the development of assessment tools and approach, ensuring FAO approval for their use; the execution of field assessments in the selected sites; and the production of this report. This report outlines the training needs and a training delivery plan; legal registration and networking recommendations; input requirements; as well as a distribution plan and costing. The desk review was done in the last week of June 2013. A field mission in Western Kenya was conducted over three weeks in August 2013. Report writing took three weeks in September 2013. The report was submitted in the third week of October 2013. Training of fish farmer groups, and provision of equipment and inputs to these groups, is scheduled for January and February 2014. This needs assessment focused on training and inputs, such as equipment and materials that are required by fish farmer groups. The assessment took place with fish farmer groups in Kisii, Kakamega, Homa Bay, Vihiga, Siaya, and Busia counties in Western Kenya. The training modules identified include: Best Management Practices (BMPs); group cohesion and development; aqua-business skills; marketing; record and book keeping; and efficient production technologies. Equipment needs include: deep freezers; sampling and harvesting nets; secchi disks; cool boxes; harvesting baskets; hapa nets; and weighing scales. From the study it is anticipated that the end point of the selected beneficiary clusters should be stand-alone, self-sufficient market structures that offer investors the best prices for inputs and products. It is also anticipated that once this end point is reached, the fish farm clusters should serve as the nuclei in an effort to expand market clusters to other small and medium enterprise investors across the country, and the region at large. The purpose was to assess the needs for aquaculture production and marketing in selected fish farmer organizations, so as to guide the support and investment choices for enhancement for sustainable aquaculture productivity and profitability in Western Kenya.  5 Recommendations include the following:  The groups to benefit from capacity building and provision of equipment include: Central Kakamega Aquaculture Cooperative; Muungano Fish Farmers (Bidii Fish Farmers and Yala Fish Farmers Cluster); Tilapia Fish Farmers Group; Wangchieng Fish Farmers Cluster; and the Butula Fish Farmers Cooperative;  The groups s hould be strengthened through training on group cohesion and market linkages;  Documentation of the work in the form of a video documentary should be undertaken to serve as a training tool. The aim is to develop long-term market linkages that optimize profits for group members.
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    Restoration of productive aquatic ecosystems by small-scale fisheries and aquaculture communities in Asia
    Good practices, innovations and success stories
    2022
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    This report showcases examples of actions taken by small-scale fishers and aquaculture farmers in Asia to restore the productivity of aquatic ecosystems. Small-scale fishers and fish farmers include some of the world’s most marginalized and impoverished people groups, yet their harvests account for over half of the world’s aquatic food production. The marine, coastal and freshwater ecosystems their livelihoods depend upon are degraded from human impacts and further at risk from climate change. Ecosystem restoration actions by fisherfolk communities can revitalize the socio-ecological services and sustain progress over time. Both passive and active restoration approaches are being employed across Asia’s marine, coastal and inland waterways. Fishers, fish farmers, and fishworkers’ restorative actions are focused on increasing the sustainability of their operations. Common approaches include eliminating destructive fishing, reducing overfishing through gear changes and effort control, restoring connectivity of floodplains and fish migration pathways, integrated aquaculture and rice-farming practices, re-stocking of native fisheries, and actively rehabilitating and / or re-establishing habitats. Progress is measurable through a diverse array of environmental, socio-economic and governance related metrics. Changes in fisheries catches, ecological connectivity, water quality, habitat diversity and structure, and fish consumption provide important measures of biodiversity gains (or losses). Common enablers of success include economic incentives, co-management and legal recognition of fishing rights, highly engaged fisherfolk cooperatives or community groups, women’s leadership and development, and community partnerships with stakeholders that focus on enabling fisherfolk’s own goals for sustainable livelihoods. Ecosystem restoration activities have not lasted when these enablers are insufficiently attended to and when environmental aspects of project feasibility, such as the choice of rehabilitation locations and / or species, are poorly planned. Successes in ecosystem restoration by fisherfolk can and are being scaled out to neighbouring communities and countries. Key to this is the sharing of stories, lessons learned and tools through south-south partnerships, learning exchanges, and women’s groups. Simple, low-cost tools and actions have enabled long-term engagement by small-scale fishers in sustainable operations. More complex actions, such as the uptake of integrated aquaculture systems, are also enabling stepwise changes in ecosystem restoration. By sharing stories from different ecosystems, fisheries, and geographies, this report seeks to help fisherfolk and their partners glean from one another and achieve faster progress in ecosystem restoration.

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