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Assessment of stocks of demersal fish off the west coasts of Thailand and Malaysia









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    Report of a bio-economic modelling workshop and a policy dialogue meeting on the Thai demersal fisheries in the Gulf of Thailand
    Hua Hin, Thailand, 31 May-9 June 2000
    2001
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    Similar to many marine fish stocks in Asia and elsewhere in the world, the demersal resources in the Gulf of Thailand have been subjected to excessive levels of fishing effort since perhaps as long as two to three decades. This has resulted in a change in catch composition with a higher share of short-lived species in the catch. The influence on the value of the catch is not unambiguously negative because several short-lived species including certain cephalopods and crustaceans fetch g ood prices in the market. In general, fish prices showed real increases over the last decade including so-called ‘trash-fish”, i.e. by-catches of small fishes that are converted into fishmeal. The rapid growth in feed-intensive livestock and shrimp culture production has resulted in a rapidly growing fishmeal market. However, there is certainly concern about the impact on the Gulf of Thailand ecosystem and on bio-diversity of a continuation of the very high levels of mostly indiscrim inate fishing effort, especially bottom trawling. While the immediate effect of a reduction of fishing effort could cause a decline in the quantity and value of the catch, the long-term benefit is likely to be very large. This is indicated by the findings of all three types of modelling approaches applied during this workshop, namely surplus production model (Gordon-Schaefer and Gordon-Fox), age-structured Thompson & Bell model (BEAM 5) and mass-balance eco-system model (ECOPATH).
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    An economic feasibility study of a trawl fishery in the Gulf lying between Iran and the Arabian peninsula 1972
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    While accurate statistical data on the depth of the demersal resources of the Gulf are scant, there is sufficient information available to justify investment in an integrated trawl fishery in some of the Gulf states. Because of the enclosed nature of the Gulf, and the fact that the coastline is divided among eight states, some of which, as a matter of national health interest, might profitably introduce fish as a dietary supplement for their people, while others are largely interested in export- market development, no single scheme can be evolved as a module for general application. However, identification of investment prospects in the United Arab Emirates and Iran should not be taken to imply that possibilities do not exist in other states. Uncertainties regarding the continuing availability, as such, of the presently defined international fishing waters (non-territorial) is a major constraint to formulation of bankable investment proposals in those states with minimal coastal frontag e. Logistical problems, including provision of port facilities, and the marketing of the potential catch present greater obstacles to development within the region than does the actual capture of fish. There is a bankable investment opportunity for a phased, first-stage, integrated trawl fishery, based on the United Arab Emirates, to operate in the territorial and adjacent waters of the Union, within the Gulf and in the Sea of Oman. There are also possibilities for extending the shore installati ons for such a scheme to cater for longer-range trawling, with medium-range freezer trawlers, in the international waters of the Gulf and the northwestern sector of the Indian Ocean. Such an extension would lend itself to promotion by joint venture between local commercial interests and an expatriate company experienced in operating such vessels. The feasibility of marketing demersal fish in Iran has been on a first-stage, integrated trawl-fishery project, provided that berthage and land can be made available at the new port of Bandar Abbas. In countries where shrimp are available, the attraction of this resource in export cash potential has acted as a constraint to trawl-fishery development, and will continue to do so unless these countries clearly establish separate zones of permitted operation for each, or completely integrate the two fisheries. Local sales of fish cannot be greatly increased in any Gulf state without carefully coordinated efforts in education of the inland populati on to accepting fish as a diet component and in development of a distribution and marketing system. Where are available to a demersal trawl fishery, good quantities of premium, first category fish such as red snapper, red mullet, grouper, and sole, which are universally known and of proved export value as well as many lesser known and unknown varieties which are worthy of promotional marketing efforts. There is an urgent need for the Gulf States to formulate, and consider means of administering, a common policy on the rational use of and protection of the resources of the Gulf in the best interests of the peoples who surround it.
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    National Report – Thailand 2013
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    Neritic tu species in the Andaman Sea Coast, Thailand comprise 7 species (Thunnus tonggol, Euthynnus affinis, Auxis thazard, A. rochie, Katsuwonus pelamis and Sarda orientalis, Scomberomorus spp.). These species were caught from purse seine, king mackerel gill net and trawl, while purse seine was the main fishing gear. The trend of neritic tu catches have been decreasing from 45,083 tons in 1997 to 13,093 tons in 1999. The production was quite stable around 10,711 and increase to 11,861 in 2009. These neritic tu species are more or less have its production trend similarity. Three Thai tu longliners were operated in the Indian Ocean in 2007 and in 2008- 2012 only two Thai tu longliners kept on fishing there. Fishing grounds were mainly in the western coast of Indian Ocean. The fishing operations were recorded 2,276 fishing days. The highest total catch was in 2010 with 607.69 tonnes followed by 2012, 2007, 2011, 2009 and 2008, respectively (494.95,461.64, 370.39, 295.23 and 265.57 tonne s). The highest CPUE was found in 2010 with 13.62 fish/1,000 hooks followed by 2012 and 2007, respectively (10.80 and 10.20 fish/1,000 hooks). The major catch species wer bigeye tu (Thunnus obesus) , yellowfin tu (T. albacores) Albacore tu (T. alalunga),swordfish and shark.

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