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Urban Consumers

Factsheet








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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Innovating to enable integrated services for innovation to promote urban and peri-urban agriculture 2024
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    The United Nations envisions that, by 2050, almost 70 percent of the global growing population will be living in urban areas, especially in small cities and towns within Africa and Asia. This will mean more people to feed in these cities, as well as the risk of nutrition problems and increased levels of obesity associated with changes in diet and lifestyle. In this context, agriculture will need to produce more nutritious food while competing for ever scarcer natural resources and struggling with the effects of climate change. Furthermore, the world is facing recent critical events such as the COVID-19 pandemic and the fuel crisis, both of which highlight the need for resilient agrifood systems in both urban and rural areas. As a result, urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA), practices that are centuries-old, are growing in importance as a means of helping to ensure the food security and livelihoods of urban dwellers. UPA can yield numerous benefits, but comes with challenges, as it is practised within the context of a high competition for natural resources, especially land. Furthermore, its practitioners – urban dwellers or migrants – often lack the necessary knowledge and skills to succeed. Given the growing importance of UPA, the integrated services for innovation (ISI) must adapt and be enabled to serve urban and peri-urban producers and other agrifood actors.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Urban food systems and COVID-19
    The role of cities and local governments in responding to the emergency
    2020
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    Cities, with their high population density, are particularly vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic and many cities in developing countries do not have adequate capacity to address the disruptions caused by the response to the health emergency. The risk is particularly high for the 1.2 billion people living in the congested and overcrowded informal urban settlements where conditions are already unsafe and unhealthy for human living. The very poor and those living in slums have extremely limited access to essential health and sanitation facilities, nutritious food and adequate infrastructure such as piped clean water and electricity. The spread of the virus in crowded cities could have extensive morbidity and mortality consequences for urban populations. The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting urban food systems worldwide, posing a number of challenges for cities and local governments that are obliged to deal with rapid changes in food availability, accessibility and affordability – which strongly impact the food security and nutrition situation of urban populations. The majority of the urban population in developing countries relies on informal sector activities and casual labour including those related to food systems (street food vendors and those working in wet markets) and have access to limited or no assets or savings. Policies to limit the effects of the virus such as lockdowns, or physical distancing can spell disaster for the livelihoods of those individuals and their families leading, inter alia, to food insecurity and deficient nutrition.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Urban and peri-urban agriculture case studies – Overview, conclusions and recommendations
    An annex to Urban and peri-urban agriculture – From production to food systems
    2022
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    The population of the world is steadily growing. Most of this population growth is concentrated in cities and urban areas, which means, 68 percent of the world’s 9.7 billion inhabitants will be urban dwellers by 2050. However, many of those currently living in cities especially, though not exclusively, in the Global South, are malnourished, impoverished and food insecure. Urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) is a vital strategy for building the resilience of cities’ food supply, reducing poverty and increasing employment, improving nutritional outcomes, and mitigating environmental degradation of urban spaces. While UPA is no silver bullet, when combined with effective city-region planning, the food system can more effciently meet the needs of diverse actors in urban areas. To provide additional insights into how UPA is managed as input for the “Urban and peri-urban agriculture: from production to food systems”, Rikolto conducted a series of case studies in six cities around the world, which are Quito (the Republic of Ecuador), Leuven (the Kingdom of Belgium), Dakar (the Republic of Senegal), Arusha (the United Republic of Tanzania), Surakarta (the Republic of Indonesia) and Tegucigalpa(the Republic of Honduras). This report first gives detailed accounts of each city and its UPA policies, challenges and practices. These are grouped according to the themes of land (availability, tenure); water(irrigation, access); labour(seasonal versus full-time, worker profile); finance (expenses, revenues, access to credit); agronomy(UPA practices, technical assistance) andvalue chain (commercialization, availability of inputs, consumer profiles). While policy mechanisms and support interventions are included among these themes, a policy overview presents the final theme of governance. These city accounts are followed by a comparative overview of all six cities and culminate in generalizable lessons-learned, interesting findings, and actionable recommendations for planners and policy-makers.

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