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Strengthening Regional Coordination and Collaboration for the Prevention and Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases with Focus on FMD And PPR and Emerging TADs in the Nena Region - TCP/RAB/3704








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    Booklet
    Protecting people and animals from disease threats
    Revised version
    2019
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    The United States Agency for International Development and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are working together to keep the world safe from infectious disease threats. Their two key programmes – Global Health Security Agenda and Emerging Pandemic Threats – are building animal health capacity to prevent, detect and respond to disease threats in over 30 countries. The Global Health Security Agenda programme develops national capacity to prevent zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases while quickly and effectively detecting and controlling diseases when they do emerge. The Emerging Pandemic Threats programme improves national capacity to pre-empt the emergence and re-emergence of infectious zoonotic disease and to prevent the next pandemic. Action against emerging pandemic threats is taken through projects on: Avian influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome, Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 and Emergency equipment stockpile. With high-impact diseases that jump from animals to humans on the rise, these programmes are reducing the risk to lives and livelihoods from national, regional and global disease spread.
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    Booklet
    Protecting people and animals from disease threats 2018
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    The United States Agency for International Development and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are working together to keep the world safe from infectious disease threats. Their two key programmes – Global Health Security Agenda and Emerging Pandemic Threats – are building animal health capacity to prevent, detect and respond to disease threats in over 30 countries. The Global Health Security Agenda programme develops national capacity to prevent zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases while quickly and effectively detecting and controlling diseases when they do emerge. The Emerging Pandemic Threats programme improves national capacity to pre-empt the emergence and re-emergence of infectious zoonotic disease and to prevent the next pandemic. Action against emerging pandemic threats is taken through projects on: Avian influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome, Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 and Emergency equipment stockpile. With high-impact diseases that jump from animals to humans on the rise, these programmes are reducing the risk to lives and livelihoods from national, regional and global disease spread.
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    Project
    Strengthening Capacities for the Prevention of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3607 2021
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    In Eritrea, 75 percent of the population is engaged in livelihood activities within the agriculture, animal husbandry and fishing sectors, which account for 16 9 percent of the gross domestic product ( and 20 30 percent of export commodities Across the country’s six agro ecological zones, livestock rearing practices are variable, although cattle 71 percent), sheep 50 percent) and goats 60 percent) are predominantly raised in the western lowlands The livestock sector alone accounts for 39 percent of the agricultural GDP and 4 6 percent of the national GDP Peste des Petits Ruminants ( poses a major threat to sheep and goat production in Eritrea The disease was first confirmed in 1993 and, since its initial incursion in the Tsorona region, PPR outbreaks have caused extensive concerns across the country Critically, in newly infected areas, mortality rates have been estimated to reach as high as 90 percent In 2014 17 outbreaks were reported and the frequency of outbreaks were on the rise In response to the 2014 epidemic, 501 300 animals were vaccinated, but this only represented less than 8 percent of the national population, while the recommended target by the FAO/OIE Global Strategy for the Control and Eradication of PPR is 75 percent Recent assessments have indicated that PPR is often misdiagnosed and under reported by pastoralists, the national laboratory capacity for PPR diagnosis is limited, the national PPR surveillance system requires strengthening and preventing the spread of PPR will require more effective post vaccination evaluation The presence and threat of PPR affects the livelihood and food security of the Eritrean population Not only does it have direct effects on animal rearing production levels, it influences economic activities, such as trade, which take place beyond the level of daily activities performed by sheep and goat farmers In an effort to move closer toward PPR eradication, the project aims to strengthen the national capacity of Eritrea to prevent and control threats posed by the disease.

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