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CL 169/OD/1 - 20 2 2 年 4 月 8 日 星期 五













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    Project
    Developing Organizational Capacity for Ecosystem Stewardship and Livelihoods in Caribbean Small-Scale Fisheries (StewardFish) - GCP/SLC/211/GFF 2022
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    The Developing Organizational Capacity for Ecosystem Stewardship and Livelihoods in Caribbean Small Scale Fisheries ( StewardFish ) project recognized that there were a number of challenges hindering the engagement of fisherfolk and their organizations in the sustainable management of fisheries in the Caribbean region, including limited capacity of fisherfolk organizations to participate effectively in fisheries governance; insufficient capacity and knowledge of ecosystem stewardship practices for fisheries sustainability among fisherfolk ; inadequate public awareness of ecosystem approaches to support best practices and ensure compliance; inadequate documentation of successful experiences and practices for sustainable fisheries livelihood strategies; and inadequate management and collaboration mechanisms to support fisherfolk leaders in monitoring and evaluating projects. In addressing these constraints, the project supported the implementation of the ten year Strategic Action Programme (SAP) for the Sustainable Management of the Shared Living Marine Resources of the Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf Large Marine Ecosystems (CLME+) in Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines by empowering fisherfolk throughout fisheries value chains to engage in resource management, decision making processes and sustainable livelihoods, with strengthened institutional support at all levels.
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    Article
    A species-specific approach for tracing Brazilian timber origins and associated illegality risks across the supply-chain
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The rise in global demand for agricultural and forest commodities have created unparalleled pressure on forests, leading to loss of carbon, biodiversity, ecosystems services, and livelihoods. While we know more about how commodity production and trade is linked to deforestation, such connection still largely unexplored for forest degradation despite the threat rivaling or exceeding that of deforestation. Timber extraction is the largest direct anthropic driver of forest degradation and its illegal share a pervasive source across domestic and international markets. Here we seek to lay the foundations for connecting localities of production to consumption, presenting a species- specific approach to quantifying sources of illegality risk across the supply chain. By adapting material flow analyses and environmentally extended input-output models to timber originating from Brazilian native forests, we demonstrate how distinct risks can be mapped and quantified. We focus on the Amazon state of Pará; a leading producer of timber, of high-value ipê, and contested forest frontier. Data on logging permits and state-level Document of Forest Origin are used to estimate sources of illegality risk associated with overstated ipê yields, unclear forest of origin and discrepancies resulting from missing physical flows. We find that less than one fourth of all ipê volume entering supply-chains in 2017-2019 is risk-free. The area explored under logging permits and volumes entering the supply chain suggest an average yield of 1.6 m3ha-1, which exceeds the 90% percentile of reported ipê tree densities for region. Nearly a third of supply-chain flows cannot be accounted for by Pará’s state-level system. Despite important limitations to this study, it puts forward an approach that can be refined and leveraged to monitor illegally logged timber entry- points and can contribute to increased transparency in Brazilian timber supply chains. Keywords: timber illegality, forest-risk commodity, environmentally-extended input-output models, Handroanthus spp., Brazilian Amazon
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