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Risk management along the food chain

Addressing the avian influenza A(H7N9) emergency








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    Booklet
    Evidence-based risk management along the livestock production and market chain: Myanmar 2019
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    Since 2007, multiple strains of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus have entered Myanmar and caused reported outbreaks. The country is at risk for zoonotic avian influenza A (H7N9) virus incursion. Furthermore, active surveillance in live bird markets regularly detects H5N1 and H5N6 HPAI viruses and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 viruses. Complex diseases require multifaceted and innovative approaches that tackle the problem and mitigate their risk from various aspects. In Myanmar, the project, “Evidence-Based Risk Management along the Livestock Production and Market Chain” works collaboratively between the Livestock Breeding and Veterinary Department (LBVD) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD). The project is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and the Australian Government.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Evidence-based risk management along the livestock production and market chain: Cambodia 2019
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    Since Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was first reported in Cambodia in 2004, outbreaks have repeatedly occurred. Takeo Live Bird Market (LBM) is one of the largest in the country and its poultry value chain connects throughout Cambodia. Moreover, the intensive cross-border movements of people, poultry and poultry products makes Takeo province a high-risk area where HPAI and Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza (LPAI) can easily spread from neighbouring areas. The prolific works of the Pasteur Institute of Cambodia (PIC) and the National Animal Health and Production Research Institute (NAHPRI) have shown that circulation of avian influenza (AI) viruses in the LBM can put poultry and stakeholders at risk of infection. By improving biosecurity and hygiene practices in the sale and slaughter of poultry in live bird markets, the project Evidence Based Risk Management Along the Livestock Production and Market Chain greatly contributes to reduce the circulation of AI viruses and lower the risk of disease transmission. The project is supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). The provincial local government in Takeo and the Office of Animal Health and Production (OAHP), market poultry traders, sellers and slaughterers are working together in a multi-stakeholder approach to improve the safety of LBM especially the practices of poultry sale and slaughter with guidance from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and the Cambodian General Directorate of Animal Health and Production (GDAHP).
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    Book (series)
    Update on the continuous spread and expansion of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza
    Clade 2.3.2.1 in Asia (2010-2012)
    2014
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    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, initially detected in 1996 in China, spread to more than 60 countries or territories on three continents within a ten-year period and has become endemic in poultry in several countries and regions (including Ganges–Brahmaputra Delta, Indonesia, Viet Nam, China and Egypt). The virus infects wild birds and domestic poultry and causes sporadic transmissions to humans raising concerns of a potential pandemic. The recent confirmation of human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N9) and bird positive findings across multiple provinces in China since April 2013 in live bird markets highlights the threat posed by existing and newly emerging avian influenza viruses irrespective of their virulence. The economic impact of disease caused by avian influenza viruses is related to losses incurred as a result of high mortality in poultry, to costs associated with control measures including poultry movement restrictions, to disruption of tra de and threats to food security of resource poor countries.

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