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Report of the Workshop of National Coordinators of the UNEP/GEF/FAO Project on Reducing the Impact of Tropical Shrimp Trawling Fisheries on Living Marine Resources Through the Adoption of Environmentally Friendly Techniques and Practices.

Rome, Italy, 17-19 March 1999











FAO. Report of the Workshop of National Coordinators of the UNEP/GEF/FAO Project on Reducing the Impact of Tropical Shrimp Trawling Fisheries on Living Marine Resources Through the Adoption of Environmentally Friendly Techniques and Practices. Rome, Italy, 17-19 March 1999. FAO Fisheries Report. No. 605. Rome, FAO. 1999. 46p.


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    Book (series)
    Report of the four GEF/UNEP/FAO Regional Workshops on Reducing the Impact of Tropical Shrimp Trawl Fisheries. Lagos, Nigeria, 15-17 December 1999. Puntareñas, Costa Rica, 15-17 January 2000. Teheran, Iran, 28 February - 1 March 2000. Denpasar, Bali, Indon 2000
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    As part of the development of the project “Reducing the impact of tropical shrimp trawling fisheries on living marine resources through the adoption of environmentally friendly techniques and practices”, mainly funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), four regional workshops were conducted during the period between December 1999 and March 2000 in Nigeria, Costa Rica, Iran and Indonesia. The main objectives of the workshops were to review the situation with regard to impact on the envir onment of shrimp trawling in each of the four regions and in the 13 participating countries in particular, and to discuss and agree on regional priorities and content of a possible main phase project. Reports from baseline studies in each of the 13 countries were presented. The most serious problems identified were capture and discard of juvenile food fish and high discard levels of most non-shrimp catch. It was also reported that more and more countries are introducing regulations to reduce d iscarding of bycatch. In some countries collecting, landing, processing and selling bycatch has become a new and viable occupation for coastal communities. Reduced shrimp catches and different levels of management action, like seasonal closure and mesh size regulations were reported by some countries. Conflicts about the use of fishing grounds and resources between industrial and artisanal fishers was reported to be widespread. The impact of trawling on the bottom habitat is an area where little knowledge exists among the participating countries. It was, however, realized that such impact might be important for some areas and the need for research within this field was stressed. Some countries have in their regulations the mandatory use of the Turtle Excluder Device, but many of these reported low compliance with such regulations.
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    Tropical shrimp fisheries and their impact on living resources 2001
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    As part of the development of the project “Reducing the impact of tropical shrimp trawling fisheries on living marine resources through the adoption of environmentally friendly techniques and practices”, mainly funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), thirteen countries in tropical regions carried out a detailed review of their shrimp fisheries and studies on the environmental impact of these activities. The findings were summarized in national reports. The national reports include : general description of the shrimp fishery (resources, fishing methods and vessel, fishing practice, effort data, shrimp catches and by-catches (including species and size composition and its utilization); regulations and management measures; research activities; impact of present exploitation and fishing practices on the shrimp and fish resources and on the bottom habitat; perception of the present situation by industry, the authorities and environmental organizations; social implications of a djusting fishing to more environmentally friendly practices; priority issues requiring actions to meet acceptable standards of environmentally friendly shrimp exploitation and, finally, a proposal for a relevant National Plan of Action.
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    An economic feasibility study of a trawl fishery in the Gulf lying between Iran and the Arabian peninsula 1972
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    While accurate statistical data on the depth of the demersal resources of the Gulf are scant, there is sufficient information available to justify investment in an integrated trawl fishery in some of the Gulf states. Because of the enclosed nature of the Gulf, and the fact that the coastline is divided among eight states, some of which, as a matter of national health interest, might profitably introduce fish as a dietary supplement for their people, while others are largely interested in export- market development, no single scheme can be evolved as a module for general application. However, identification of investment prospects in the United Arab Emirates and Iran should not be taken to imply that possibilities do not exist in other states. Uncertainties regarding the continuing availability, as such, of the presently defined international fishing waters (non-territorial) is a major constraint to formulation of bankable investment proposals in those states with minimal coastal frontag e. Logistical problems, including provision of port facilities, and the marketing of the potential catch present greater obstacles to development within the region than does the actual capture of fish. There is a bankable investment opportunity for a phased, first-stage, integrated trawl fishery, based on the United Arab Emirates, to operate in the territorial and adjacent waters of the Union, within the Gulf and in the Sea of Oman. There are also possibilities for extending the shore installati ons for such a scheme to cater for longer-range trawling, with medium-range freezer trawlers, in the international waters of the Gulf and the northwestern sector of the Indian Ocean. Such an extension would lend itself to promotion by joint venture between local commercial interests and an expatriate company experienced in operating such vessels. The feasibility of marketing demersal fish in Iran has been on a first-stage, integrated trawl-fishery project, provided that berthage and land can be made available at the new port of Bandar Abbas. In countries where shrimp are available, the attraction of this resource in export cash potential has acted as a constraint to trawl-fishery development, and will continue to do so unless these countries clearly establish separate zones of permitted operation for each, or completely integrate the two fisheries. Local sales of fish cannot be greatly increased in any Gulf state without carefully coordinated efforts in education of the inland populati on to accepting fish as a diet component and in development of a distribution and marketing system. Where are available to a demersal trawl fishery, good quantities of premium, first category fish such as red snapper, red mullet, grouper, and sole, which are universally known and of proved export value as well as many lesser known and unknown varieties which are worthy of promotional marketing efforts. There is an urgent need for the Gulf States to formulate, and consider means of administering, a common policy on the rational use of and protection of the resources of the Gulf in the best interests of the peoples who surround it.

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