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Artificial Reproduction and Pond Rearing of the African Catfish Clarias Gariepinus in Sub-Saharan Africa - A Handbook










de Graaf, G.; Janssen, H. Artificial reproduction and pond rearing of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus in sub-Saharan Africa - A handbook FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 362. Rome, FAO. 1996. 73p.


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