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EMPRES Food Safety - Emergency Prevention System for Food Safety

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    Document
    Evaluation of the Emergency Prevention System (EMPRES) Programme in Food Chain Crises
    Project evaluation series
    2018
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    In today’s inter-connected world, trans-boundary animal/ plant diseases and pests are becoming a greater concern. Countries are increasingly investing in policies and regulations to manage old and new trans-boundary diseases that threaten health, markets and the safe production of food. FAO is uniquely positioned to assist countries to scale up their capacities and manage these threats. The EMPRES programme for emergency prevention systems, built on its animal health and locust programmes, now covers plant pests and diseases, aquatic diseases, food safety and forest health under one framework. Each programme component has produced positive results where support was extended. However, the programme rarely offered countries cohesive support covering all the relevant areas. A more cohesive multi-sectoral approach would enhance visibility and allow countries to better understand the range of assistance provided, leading to better and more relevant support to countries.
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    Document
    Evaluation of the Emergency Prevention System (EMPRES) Programme in Food Chain Crises - Executive Summary
    Project evaluation - Executive Summary
    2018
    In today’s inter-connected world, trans-boundary animal/ plant diseases and pests are becoming a greater concern. Countries are increasingly investing in policies and regulations to manage old and new trans-boundary diseases that threaten health, markets and the safe production of food. FAO is uniquely positioned to assist countries to scale up their capacities and manage these threats. The EMPRES programme for emergency prevention systems, built on its animal health and locust programmes, now covers plant pests and diseases, aquatic diseases, food safety and forest health under one framework. Each programme component has produced positive results where support was extended. However, the programme rarely offered countries cohesive support covering all the relevant areas. A more cohesive multi-sectoral approach would enhance visibility and allow countries to better understand the range of assistance provided, leading to better and more relevant support to countries.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Risk Communication Applied to Food Safety Handbook 2016
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    Recent global, regional and national food-borne disease outbreaks and/or large food recalls have had adverse impacts on consumer confidence in the safety of the food supply and agri-food production and trade (3). Post-event analysis of such events has indicated the importance of more effective use of risk communication principles and practices. Countries are encouraged to develop and assess their existing risk communication plans and practices applied to food safety and to learn from their own or other countries’ experiences. As the use of the Internet and social media technologies increases both in developed and developing countries, the public’s demand for greater transparency and more salient food safety risk information can be expected, confirming the importance of effective risk communication strategies in food safety and the broader public health sector. The purpose of this Handbook is to support countries, national food safety authorities and food chain stakeholders in establishing or enhancing risk communication practice and capacity in the food safety sector. This Handbook focuses on practical principles and best practices of risk communication to support risk management of adverse food safety (including quality) events associated with biological, chemical or physical hazards. The focus of this Handbook is on the use of risk communication in the process of risk analysis to manage both emergency food safety risks (e.g. foodborne illness outbreaks) and non-emergency or more enduring food safety issues (e.g. food safety and health promotion campaigns). The Handbook begins with a broad overview of the key goals and concepts of risk communication.

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