Thumbnail Image

Weather and Desert Locusts











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Emergency Assistance to Desert Locust Monitoring and Control Operations in Kenya - TCP/KEN/3801 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Horn of Africa is facing the worst Desert Locust crisis in over 25 years, and the most serious in 70 years for Kenya Desert Locust swarms first appeared in northeast Kenya on 28 December 2019 arriving from adjacent areas of Ethiopia and Somalia to the north The swarms spread rapidly and at an alarming rate Their presence was confirmed in Mandera Wajir Marsabit and Garissa counties, and there were new reports of swarms in Meru and Isiolo counties On 8 January 2020 a very large swarm was reported west of Mandera which was 40 km by 60 km in size It was also starting to mature, suggesting the likelihood of breeding, which would require a hopper band control campaign to be mounted, in addition to a campaign to control the current swarms The swarm invasion and its potential to multiply and spread rapidly to other counties posed an unprecedented threat to food security and livelihoods in the country The occurrence of the pest in northern Kenya caused particular concern, as the agropastoral communities in the region were recovering from a prolonged drought It was therefore critical and urgent to deploy both prevention and control operational mechanisms, to significantly reduce the potential impact of the Desert Locust in the affected areas of the country.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO’s Commission ensures sustainability of Desert Locust preventive control in West and Northwest Africa 2016
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The FAO COMMISSION for controlling the Desert Locust in the Western Region (CLCPRO) strengthens national capacities of locust-affected countries in West and Northwest Africa in planning, training, research and effective and timely response to Desert Locust invasions in order to prevent upsurges and plagues. The Commission contributes significantly to food and livelihoods security in northern Africa through its regional approach in preventing serious damage that locusts can inflict on pastures an d agricultural production in the concerned member countries.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Emergency Response to The Desert Locust Crisis in Yemen - TCP/YEM/3801 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Desert Locust (Schistocerca gregaria) is potentially the world’s most dangerous pest, causing catastrophic damage to crops and pastures and representing a major threat to food security. It is a transboundary pest with the ability to spread over large areas, destroying vegetation and leading to famine and displacement. Outbreaks occur periodically but are complex to predict. When not managed at the place of origin or breeding ground, they can lead to losses of up to 100 percent of food and fodder crops. In Yemen, control operations against mature swarms, mature groups and hopper groups of DL have been in progress for some years. In 2019, 153 225 ha were surveyed and 13 407 ha ground-treated with ultra-low volume (ULV) pesticide. In February 2020, reports from DLMCC of MAI indicated that low to moderate populations of DL had been found in the southern part of the country and high pollution in dry and coastal areas, where heavy rainfall provided favourable ecological conditions for DL breeding and development. The control and management of new generations of DL is the responsibility of PPD, which was faced by a series of problems. These included a shortage of control application equipment and vehicles for survey and control operations, and, most seriously, a shortage of pesticide. Training in locust management procedures and operations for PPD and DLMCC locust staff was also required, as well as the conduct of a needs assessment. Finally, the unstable situation in the country had led to a serious deterioration of financial support to the main public services, impeding the field operations of DLMCC. Against this background, MAI requested FAO technical support and funds to address and manage the problem.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.