Thumbnail Image

负责任鱼品利用










FAO Technical Guidelines for Responsible Fisheries. No. 7. Rome, FAO. 2000.


Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Responsible fish utilization 1998
    Also available in:

    These guidelines have been produced to support the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries particularly with regard to the need for responsibility in the post-harvest sector of the fish producing industry. The industry that produces fish for food has three major areas of responsibility: to the consumer of the food to ensure that it is safe to eat, is of expected quality and nutritional value, to the resource to ensure that it is not wasted and to the envir onment to ensure that negative impacts are minimized. In addition the industry has a responsibility to itself to ensure the continued ability of many millions of people throughout the world to earn a gainful living from working within the industry. Article 11.1 of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and other related parts of the Code are concerned particularly with these responsibilities. This publication provides annotation to and guidance on these articles to assist those c harged with implementation of the Code to identify possible courses of action necessary to ensure that the industry is conducted in a sustainable manner.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the four GEF/UNEP/FAO Regional Workshops on Reducing the Impact of Tropical Shrimp Trawl Fisheries. Lagos, Nigeria, 15-17 December 1999. Puntareñas, Costa Rica, 15-17 January 2000. Teheran, Iran, 28 February - 1 March 2000. Denpasar, Bali, Indon 2000
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    As part of the development of the project “Reducing the impact of tropical shrimp trawling fisheries on living marine resources through the adoption of environmentally friendly techniques and practices”, mainly funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), four regional workshops were conducted during the period between December 1999 and March 2000 in Nigeria, Costa Rica, Iran and Indonesia. The main objectives of the workshops were to review the situation with regard to impact on the envir onment of shrimp trawling in each of the four regions and in the 13 participating countries in particular, and to discuss and agree on regional priorities and content of a possible main phase project. Reports from baseline studies in each of the 13 countries were presented. The most serious problems identified were capture and discard of juvenile food fish and high discard levels of most non-shrimp catch. It was also reported that more and more countries are introducing regulations to reduce d iscarding of bycatch. In some countries collecting, landing, processing and selling bycatch has become a new and viable occupation for coastal communities. Reduced shrimp catches and different levels of management action, like seasonal closure and mesh size regulations were reported by some countries. Conflicts about the use of fishing grounds and resources between industrial and artisanal fishers was reported to be widespread. The impact of trawling on the bottom habitat is an area where little knowledge exists among the participating countries. It was, however, realized that such impact might be important for some areas and the need for research within this field was stressed. Some countries have in their regulations the mandatory use of the Turtle Excluder Device, but many of these reported low compliance with such regulations.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Fisheries management. 1. Conservation and management of sharks 2000
    These Guidelines have been produced to support implementation of the International Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (IPOA-Sharks). The Guidelines are addressed to decision-makers and policy-makers associated with conserving shark and other chondrichthyan species and with managing the harvest of these resources, but they should be of interest to fishing industries and other parties. The IPOA-Sharks is consistent with the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, agreements from the 1995 United Nations Conference on Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks, and any applicable rules of international law. It encompasses all shark and other chondrichthyan fisheries, both target and non-target fisheries, whether they be industrial, artisanal or traditional fisheries or fishing programmes designed to reduce risk of shark attack on humans. The IPOA-Sharks is not a full strategic plan for the world, rather it prescribes a process whereby indiv idual States, States participating in sub-regional arrangements through bilateral and multilateral agreements to manage shared transboundary shark stocks, and relevant regional fisheries management organizations (RFMO), identify national, subregional and regional issues and then develop national and regional Shark Plans to address the issues. The guiding principles of the IPOA-Sharks and the Guidelines are that States contributing to fishing mortality of a species or stock should participate i n its conservation and management, and that, as a traditional and important source of food, employment and income, shark resources be used sustainably. The precautionary approach to conservation and management is embraced when the status of a resource is uncertain, such as when fishery data are insufficient or unreliable.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.