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Protecting land and natural resources tenure rights in the era of COVID-19 by heeding the lessons from the past











FAO. 2020. ​Protecting land and natural resources tenure rights in the era of COVID-19 by heeding the lessons from the past. Rome.



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    Policy brief
    COVID-19, land, natural resources, gender issues and Indigenous Peoples' rights in Asia 2022
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    Secure tenure rights and meaningful participation in the management of land, territories and natural resources are a key element for the food security of Indigenous Peoples, who often rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. Indigenous Peoples have a strong cultural, spiritual, social and economic connection with their land, which is closely linked to their identity and existence itself. Land and natural resources tenure security is also at the core of human rights’ enjoyment among Indigenous Peoples. Their right to food, shelter and an adequate standard of living – just to name a few – are closely linked to secure tenure rights. Furthermore, Indigenous Peoples play a critical role ensuring sustainable development and biodiversity conservation, and their land tenure security is closely associated with that. Before the pandemic, forced evictions and conflicts over their land, territories and resources were already driving Indigenous Peoples into poverty and vulnerability. The COVID-19 crisis has led to reports of encroachment upon indigenous land, creating hardship during an especially difficult time and placing Indigenous Peoples in a precarious situation. In this context, this brief asks specifically what impact COVID-19 is having on Indigenous Peoples’ rights, especially women, elaborating on how challenges could be overcome leaving no one behind.
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    Maximising nutrition into the forestry sector : from theory to practice using a stepwise impact pathway approach
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Although forests, particularly wild foods, contribute to up to two thirds of forest dwellers’ and even the wider community’s food security and nutrition, few measures are in place that protect wild foods as a right. This burden is largely the result of gaps within the forestry sector. Formal food systems involving land ownership, rights and sustainable production do not exist for most wild foods, leading to the limited contribution of wild foods to food security, nutrition and livelihoods.

    Protecting these communities and food systems by providing a food systems-based, nutrition sensitive and supportive policy and research environment will allow them to improve and sustainably manage their resources and maintain their cultural and traditional practices. This could lead to improved health and nutritional outcomes, especially among vulnerable groups such as women and children, and a greater resilience to threats such as climate change and zoonotic disease.

    Integrating nutrition into forestry sector is critical to addressing the prevalence of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. However, uncertainty over what practical approach to adopt remains a challenge for policymakers and practitioners at all levels, due to a lack of proven methodological tools. To help address this challenge, the FAO, World Vision and Action contre la Faim have developed an innovative stepwise approach that guides users on the use of food systems-based impact pathways for integrating nutrition into the forestry sector. This work was carried out as part of a consultative process involving technical experts and operational stakeholders from Uganda, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Chad. The results obtained demonstrate the utility of this methodological process in helping political decision-makers and field officers formulate and evaluate nutrition-sensitive policies, programmes and interventions. Keywords: Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation, One Health, Policies, Sustainable forest management ID: 3623064
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    Document
    Women and Land in the Muslim World
    Pathways to increase access to land for the realization of development, peace and human rights
    2018
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    Women’s access to land is crucial to ensure social and economic development and food security; it contributes to the realization of human rights, empowerment and participation of women; it helps to protect women from violence and health hazards, and it enables them to play a bigger role in the stabilization of societies in crisis and conflict. For women, access to land means security, stability, independence and freedom. Unfortunately, socially prescribed gender roles, unequal power dynamics at household and community level, discriminatory family practices, unequal access to justice, institutions and land administration processes, traditional norms and local tenure relationships frequently deny women adequate access to land for farming, housing, or other social and economic purposes. Such challenges are faced by women in the Muslim world as well as in other parts of the world. However, 20 per cent of the world’s population is Muslim and - despite the significant national differences encountered - certain common land-related patterns reflecting customary and religious practices emerge in the Muslim world as elements that shape the way women can access to, use of and control over land. This report looks at global normative work, regional frameworks, and good countrylevel practices, it provides an analysis of the most important aspects to be taken into consideration to successfully secure women’s access to land in the Muslim world and makes a set of evidence-based and context specific recommendations for action. The report builds on key concepts, tools and approaches developed in the past decade by the Global Land Tool Network, such as the continuum of land rights, the fit-for-purpose land administration, the appreciation of the diversity of women, and the engagement with aspects of Islamic land law for the protection of the land rights of women and of the most vulnerable. The ideas and recommendations suggested here are intended to be used by wide range of policymakers, land practitioners, development and humanitarian workers, civil society, religious leaders, women’s organizations, communities and donors.

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