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Community-based animal health workers (cahws) In pastoralist areas of kenya: A study on selection processes, impact and sustainability








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    Community-Based Animal Health Workers in Pastoralist Areas of Kenya
    A Study on Selection Processes, Impact and Sustainability
    2003
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    The research on community-based animal health workers (CAHW) was undertaken in West Pokot Wajir and Marsabit Districts of Kenya. The objectives of the study were fourfold. First, the study aimed to identify the 'ideal' qualities of CAHWs as perceived by veterinary policy makers and pastoral livestock keepers. Second, it was intended to investigate the relationship between applied selection criteria and selection procedures for CAHWs and the sustainability of CAH systems. The third objective was to evaluate gender issues in the selection of CAHWs. And finally, the fourth objective was to elaborate evidence-based policy recommendations to the appropriate decision makers on the standardisation of CAHW selection, training and supervision procedures with a view of ensuring quality and sustainability of CAH systems.
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    Protecting agricultural workers through remote COVID-19 awareness campaigns in Pakistan
    Using digital media and distanced messaging to promote virus mitigation and combat misinformation
    2020
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    The continuing COVID-19 pandemic—and related lockdowns—triggered a massive cash crisis around the world for families who depend on informal earnings, including daily wage workers. In Pakistan, a nationwide lockdown was imposed on 21 March 2020. This had major reverberations on the food supply chain and agriculture sector, where restrictive measures threatened the livelihoods of workers and smallholder farmers. In total, as of 12 July 2020, there were 248 872 confirmed cases throughout Pakistan. Lockdown-related challenges have created new threats to public health, with communities struggling to adhere to restrictions while still securing food for their families. Overall, society’s most vulnerable and food insecure segments have been disproportionately affected by the immediate impacts of lockdown measures, which include sudden unemployment, food price shocks, disruptions in marketing and food trade, logistics and production, and upended labor migration patterns. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Pakistan, together with partners, delivered both physical and remote sensitization messages: field-based resources—including close to 80 000 materials printed and distributed by over 300 000 frontline workers—were complemented with remote communication technologies, ranging from social media posts, local radio broadcasts, and newly modified online components to the Farmer Field School (FFS) platform.
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    Improving pasture management in arid and semi-arid lands in the Horn of Africa through Pastoralist Field Schools
    An implementation strategy to support pastoralist communities build resilience against drought
    2018
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    Recurrent drought, degraded rangelands and reduced access to traditional grazing lands have left pastoral communities in the Horn of Africa’s arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) more vulnerable and facing severe livestock feed shortages. During dry spells, pastoral communities suffer from food and nutrition insecurity, as well as shrinking incomes occasioned by livestock losses and reduced livestock production. Climate change adds an extra layer of vulnerability to this already fragile ecosystem, exacerbating the underlying causes of poverty and food insecurity. Over the last ten years, the Horn of Africa has faced seven major drought events, which have killed more than half of the cattle population in the most heavily affected areas and decimated the livelihoods of millions of pastoralists each year. Estimates indicate that during the 2016/2017 drought, over 2 million livestock were lost in Ethiopia’s Somali region alone. In these areas, cattle milk production decreased by as much as 80 percent. During the past two decades, FAO and its partners have conducted Pastoralist Field Schools (PFS) in the Horn of Africa’s ASALs to address this challenging context. Specifically, this document describes how their recent experiences with PFS in Kenya and Ethiopia have contributed to restoring the livelihoods of livestock-dependent communities through improved pasture management.

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