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International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture - Second edition









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    Document
    International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA)
    What the International Treaty does
    2016
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    The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture is an FAO international instrument that promotes the conservation and sustainable use of agricultural biological diversity. Through this legally binding treaty, Member Countries can easily exchange genetic material through facilitated access to the largest global pool of genetic diversity for food security, sustainable agriculture and climate change adaptation. The Treaty ensures that farmers, plant breeders and scienti sts have access to plant genetic resources and share the benefits, including financial resources, derived from conservation, research and breeding of those materials.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The plants that feed the world
    Baseline data and metrics to inform strategies for the conservation and use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture
    2023
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    The availability of comprehensive and reliable information is crucial for developing evidence-based policies and strategies for the conservation and use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. Information on food and agricultural crops, on their use, interdependence, demand, supply, and security is increasingly available but scattered through a number of information systems, databases and scientific literature. This study was undertaken by a team of international experts to pool together information from a wide range of sources in a user-friendly manner and to develop a reproducible set of metrics and indicators, complementing existing indicators. The main global database sources consulted include FAOSTAT, the Data Store of the International Treaty, FAO WIEWS, Genesys PGR, GBIF, PlantSearch, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault’s SeedPortal, UPOV’s PLUTO database, and NCBI’s Entrez database. The resulting metrics were organized into five domains – crop use, interdependence, demand, supply, and security. The study includes findings about the importance of the Multilateral System of Access and Benefit-sharing of the International Treaty, the primary global operational mechanism to exchange plant germplasm needed for research and breeding around the world, while pointing at gaps and possibilities to enable its growth. A number of vignettes complete the study with information on contemporary issues on crop conservation and use, to further showcase how the management of plant genetic diversity is evolving at present. It is hoped that this publication will support countries, researchers, breeders and other stakeholders in prioritizing activities, implementing multilateral frameworks and leading policy discussions related to plant genetic resources for food and agriculture.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Sharing the benefits of plant genetic diversity: the Benefit-sharing Fund 2020
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    In the last century, parts of the world’s food crop diversity disappeared forever reducing coping strategies and resources needed to grow crops that are more resilient, more productive, and nutritious. Small-scale farmers, especially those most vulnerable to climate change and food insecurity, greatly depend on diverse seeds to ensure their livelihoods. The Benefit-sharing Fund is a multilateral Fund established under the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture to support projects in developing countries, addressing food security, adaptation to climate change, and agricultural biodiversity. Since its establishment in 2009, the Fund has worked in 67 developing countries to enable small-scale farmers, scientists and breeders to use and conserve genetic diversity and tap into the Treaty’s global genepool of millions of different genetic material to undertake research and develop varieties particularly adapted to socio-environmental conditions.

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