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Improving communications for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Africa: How should we move forward?

FSN Forum in Africa report of activity No. 16










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Améliorer les communications sur la résistance aux antimicrobiens (RAM) en Afrique: comment aller de l'avant?
    Rapport d'activité du Forum FSN en Afrique no 16
    2020
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    Ce document résume la discussion en ligne Améliorer les communications sur la résistance aux antimicrobiens (RAM) en Afrique: Comment aller de l’avant? tenue sur le Forum global sur la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition (Forum FSN) de la FAO du 2 au 30 juin 2020. La discussion a été coordonnée par Scott Newman du Bureau régional de la FAO pour l’Afrique à Accra, au Ghana. L’émergence et la propagation de la résistance aux antimicrobiens (RAM) du fait de la mauvaise utilisation de médicaments antimicrobiens complique la gestion de nombreuses maladies infectieuses, compromettant la santé et le bien-être des animaux ainsi que la production alimentaire. La complexité de la crise de la RAM et de la pollution antimicrobienne nécessite une approche coordonnée et intégrée qui rapproche les secteurs de la santé publique et la santé animale, la production agricole et la gestion environnementale. Les participants à cette discussion en ligne ont été invités à échanger des idées et discuter de la manière d’améliorer la communication sur la RAM et d’impliquer les parties prenantes nécessaires, garantissant ainsi l’inscription de cette question importante dans les priorités maximales des agendas de développement nationaux et régionaux. Les résultats de cette discussion ont contribué à informer la stratégie de communication et de plaidoyer sur la RAM pour l’Afrique actuellement mise au point par la Tripartite régionale (FAO, OIE, OMS) et l’Union africaine (Centres africains de prévention et de contrôle des maladies et UA-BIRA).
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    Booklet
    Africa Regional Strategy on Antimicrobial Resistance Communications and Advocacy 2022
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    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when germs, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites change over time and no longer respond to antimicrobials – antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals and antiparasitic agents – making infections harder to treat and increasing the risk of disease spread, severe illness and death. Antimicrobial resistant germs are found in people, animals, food, plants and the environment (in water, soil and air). They can spread from person to person or between people and animals,including from food of animal origin. While AMR occurs naturally over time, usually through genetic changes, the main drivers of AMR include the misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in human health and agriculture; lack of access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) for both humans and animals; poor infection and disease prevention and control in healthcare facilities and farms; poor access to quality, affordable medicines, vaccines and diagnostics; lack of awareness and knowledge; and weak enforcement of legislation. Minimizing the emergence and spread of AMR requires a coordinated, focused multisectoral and multinational effort. The Africa Regional Strategy on Antimicrobial Resistance Communications and Advocacy was developed to serve as a guide for African countries to improve awareness of AMR and its consequences in Africa, to promote careful use of antimicrobials among key stakeholders, and to support countries to communicate on AMR in a consistent manner.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Antimicrobial resistance monitoring and surveillance guidelines for food-producing animals and their products in Eastern Africa 2024
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    This publication is a building block of the Eastern Africa antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance roadmap that was described in April 2019, by AMR experts from Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda. The roadmap is presented in chapter six of this document. The national AMR experts came together in a regional meeting organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and also attended by other national, regional and international organizations such as the World Organisation for Animal Health (WOAH), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Kenya, University of Nairobi (UON), Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), World Animal Protection (WAP) and African Union-Interagency Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR). The aim of the roadmap is to set out the processes, tools and coordination that technical experts and decision-makers from within national governments in East Africa agreed should be undertaken at regional level to support development and implementation of national AMR surveillance strategies and plans.

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