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Working together for mountain peoples and environments












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    Book (stand-alone)
    Understanding and protecting mountain soils
    A contribution from mountain areas to the I4704E/1/05.15 International Year of Soils 2015
    2015
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    In every mountain region, soils constitute the foundation for agriculture, supporting essential ecosystem functions and food security. Mountain soils benefit not only the 900 million people living in the world’s mountainous areas but also billions more living downstream. Soil is a fragile resource that needs time to regenerate. Mountain soils are particularly susceptible to climate change, deforestation, unsustainable farming practices and resource extraction methods that affect their fertility and trigger land degradation, desertification and disasters such as floods and landslides. Mountain peoples often have a deep-rooted connection to the soils they live on; it is a part of their heritage. Over the centuries, they have developed solutions and techniques, indigenous practices, knowledge and sustainable soil management approaches which have proved to be a key to resilience. This publication, produced by the Mountain Partnership as a contribution to the International Year of Soils 201 5, presents the main features of mountain soil systems, their environmental, economic and social values, the threats they are facing and the cultural traditions concerning them. Case studies provided by Mountain Partnership members and partners around the world showcase challenges and opportunities as well as lessons learned in soil management. This publication presents a series of lessons learned and recommendations to inform mountain communities, policy-makers, development experts and academic s who support sustainable mountain development.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Sustainable Mountain Development - Enhancing the resilience of mountain people and their environments 2019
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    Mountains are key ecosystems, providing goods and services, such as water, food and energy, to the entire planet. In particular, mountains provide and regulate up to 80 percent of global freshwater resources. However, mountain people are among the worlds’ poorest: one in every three lives in extreme poverty. Climate change has a strong impact on mountain areas, increasing the occurrence of disasters and exacerbating desertification, land degradation and soil erosion. Consequently, living in mountain areas is increasingly difficult and the vulnerability of mountain peoples to food insecurity is worsening, often forcing people to migrate. The sustainable mountain development programme is dedicated to improving the lives of mountain peoples and protecting mountain environments around the world. FAO’s Sustainable Mountain Development programme supports concrete action on the ground to improve the livelihoods and the sustainable management of natural resources in mountains.
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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the project "Sustainable management of mountainous forest and land resources under climate change conditions
    GCP/KYR/010/GFF
    2022
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    The project was designed to address the following interlinked barriers preventing sustainable land and forest management outcomes and building resilience to climate change in Kyrgyz mountain ecosystems: inadequate legal framework for sustainable forest and land management, inadequate land tenure reforms, outdated approaches to sustainable forest and land management, and limited capacity of local institutions. The project’s overall objective is to enhance the enabling environment in the forestry and agricultural sectors and sustain the flow of ecosystem services, including enhancement of carbon stocks in forests and agro-ecosystems through the sustainable management and enhanced productivity of mountainous silvo-agro-pastoral ecosystems, and to improve productivity and mountain livelihoods in the Kyrgyz Republic. Overall, the evaluation rated the project as “moderately satisfactory”, with several examples of positive new approaches introduced by the project into forestry, agriculture and pasture management. The evaluation included specific recommendations not only to FAO, but also to the national forestry service. One of the innovative recommendations is to revisit the project sites in five to ten years to check certain success factors, such as the tree survival rates.

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