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Year in review 2021: Central Africa

Highlights of FAO's emergency and resilience programming









FAO. 2022. Year in review 2021: Central Africa – Highlights of FAO's emergency and resilience programming. Rome. 



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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Year in review 2021: Near East and North Africa
    Highlights of FAO's emergency and resilience programming
    2022
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    The Near East and North Africa region faces several intersecting challenges that have increased fragility, threatened resilience and exacerbated already high levels of acute food insecurity and malnutrition, including famine risk in Yemen. These include scarcity of water and arable land, climate change and climate-related disasters, conflict, land degradation, increasing population growth, and transboundary animal and plant pests and diseases. As a heavily import-dependent region, the agrifood sector has also been severely affected by increases in prices of basic food items and agricultural inputs, exacerbated by the current economic shocks, including those caused by COVID-19. This has worsened the food security situation, especially for already vulnerable families. In 2021, conflict remained the main driver of food insecurity in the region. The three conflict-affected countries in the region (the Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic and Yemen) were among the top ten countries with the highest number of people in crisis or worse (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification [IPC] Phase 3 and above) levels of food insecurity in the world. This publication gives an overview of the emergency and resilience activities implemented in the Near East and North Africa in 2021.
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    Booklet
    Monitoring food security in countries with conflict situations
    A joint FAO/WFP update for the members of the United Nations Security Council
    2019
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    This update, facilitated by the Food Security Information Network and produced under the Global Network Against Food Crises, provides the members of the United Nations Security Council with an overview of the magnitude, severity and drivers of acute food insecurity in nine countries and territories that have the world’s highest burden of people in need of emergency food, nutrition and livelihood assistance as a result of protracted conflict combined with other factors. This issue focuses on the acute food insecurity situation in: Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Lake Chad Basin, Somalia, South Sudan, the Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic and Yemen. The latest evidence clearly shows a general deterioration in the food security situation in countries with conflict between January and August 2019. In South Sudan, food security has continued to decline despite the peace process. Similarly, a worsening situation is observed in the Lake Chad Basin (particularly in Cameroon’s Far North), the Sudan, Afghanistan and the Syrian Arab Republic. In Yemen and the Central African Republic, armed conflict has persisted even after the implementation of peace accords. The provision of multi-sector humanitarian assistance has been vital in preventing catastrophic food crises in these countries from worsening. Yet, access to distribute relief assistance, assess needs and monitor beneficiaries is severely constrained by continued fighting and violence against humanitarian workers. High fuel prices, checkpoints, landmines and explosive remnants of war, damaged roads and difficult terrain have further exacerbated access constraints in these countries/territories.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Democratic Republic of the Congo | Strengthening the resilience of smallholder farmers and vulnerable populations 2020
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    Despite its vast natural resources, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is still experiencing the second largest food crisis in the world after Yemen. According to results of the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification analysis, 15.6 million people are facing severe acute food insecurity. In addition, some 5.8 million people required nutrition assistance in 2019, including 800 000 pregnant and lactating women, and 5 million children suffering from acute malnutrition. The protracted conflict in the country, particularly in the eastern and Kasai provinces, is triggering large-scale population displacements, disrupting agricultural activities and hampering access to markets, schools and healthcare services. In North and South Kivu, insecurity, population displacement and the effects of recurring climate shocks have devastated the socio-economic fabric, where young people remain vulnerable to recruitment by armed groups due to the lack of job opportunities and low levels of education. Thanks to funding from Germany, FAO, UNICEF and WFP will implement an integrated resilience programme building on the comparative advantages of each of the three agencies to provide targeted beneficiaries with multisectoral assistance. The objective is to strengthen the resilience of smallholder farmers and vulnerable populations in food-insecure areas, and improve their livelihoods and access to basic social services through a variety of complementary activities.

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