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Livestock and Livelihoods: Challenges and Opportunities for Asia in the Emerging Market Environment









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    Meeting
    Beyond Agriculture?: The Promise of the Rural Economy for Growth and Poverty Reduction. Workshop Synthesis
    Rome, Italy, 16-18 January 2006
    2006
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    The workshop entitled “Beyond Agriculture?: The Promise of the Rural Economy for Growth and Poverty Reduction” was held at the FAO headquarters in Rome from the 16th to the 18th of January. In organizing the workshop, FAO was seeking to raise awareness on how recent trends and changes such as globalization shape the context in which rural economies operate and what are the implications for policies to reduce rural poverty. More than 70% of the poor live in rural areas where the agriculture sector plays a fundamental role. In this context, the purpose of the workshop was to gain a better understanding of how the current rural development paradigm is evolving, what are the drivers of these changes, what can make rural development strategies more effective and which role FAO could most strategically play in the effort of efficient and effective rural development. The meeting’s objective were fivefold: (1) understand how changes in “drivers” (such as globalisation and changes in fo od systems) may cause a shift in the prevailing Rural Development paradigm, and what may the regional characteristics of such a paradigm be; (2) raise awareness on a poverty reduction/rural development strategy and the role of agriculture in such a strategy; (3) examine rural household strategies for getting out of poverty; (4) produce guidelines or a checklist of issues to be considered in guiding rural development policy; and (5) learn how the paradigm shift translates into analysis and policy directions primarily for FAO. The workshop combined a number of background papers and studies, some of a more general and theoretical level and some with a more regional or country focus. This format allowed firstly to set the scene of the specific topic and subsequently to delve into more specific facets of the specific issue under investigation. The workshop lasted two days and a half and set off with an opening plenary session and was concluded by a closing round-table discussion. The workshop was divided into seven sessions, each of which contained the presentation of one background paper and two study papers then followed by the comments of a discussant. At the end of each session the floor was opened to a broader discussion with the participation of all present. The first session set the scene of the workshop with an overview of definitions and current trends aiming at investigating the evolution of rural development policy and the paradigm shift. The second session discussed transformations in agriculture and the impacts on rural development. The third session focused on gaining a better understanding of rural non-farm generating activities: whether the latter are refuge/survival strategies or a pathway out of poverty. The fourth session aimed at gaining a better understanding of the reasons and effects of migration in an agricultural context and whether migration out of rural areas is promoting or hampering rural development. Session 5 addressed the issue of government spending and the impact of government spending for public goods vis-à-vis the productive sectors of the rural economies. Session six analyzed the variation in institutional frameworks in the context of rural development and the paradigm shift. Session 7 provided an overview of how multilateral banks are promoting their rural development strategies and what changes are being promoted
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    Book (series)
    Report of the FAO Expert Workshop on On-farm feeding and feed management in aquaculture. Manila, the Philippines, 13–15 September 2010. 2010
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    The FAO Expert Workshop on “On-farm feeding and feed management in aquaculture” was convened in Manila, the Philippines, from 13–15 September 2010. The workshop was attended by a wide range of aquaculture researchers, development specialists and industrial experts from around the world. The workshop was convened by the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department, Aquaculture Service (FIRA) and was hosted by the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC/AQD) based in Iloilo, the Philippines. The workshop was organized with three objectives: a) to review and analyze the existing knowledge on the application of feed management as a tool for reducing feed costs in aquaculture, b) to identify the major issues and constraints of feed management and those that need to be addressed and c) to prepare a list of recommendations to define/suggest the future course of action, including the preparation of technical manuals/guidelines for dissemination to farmers. The workshop convened both in plenary and in working groups. In the plenary, participants heard technical presentations intended to orient them to the issues and constraints pertaining to on-farm feeding and feed management. These presentations included invited reviews, case studies and synthesis of the case studies. Following several working group deliberations and a general plenary discussion, the participants identified seven primary issues that currently constrain feed use and management in aqua culture, namely: 1) limited access to information on feed and feed ingredients (availability, prices and quality); 2) poor feed preparation, processing, handling and storage at the farm level; 3) inadequate monitoring of feed and farm performances; 4) low impact of current dissemination strategies on improved feeding and feed management; 5) gaps in the understanding of the economic aspects of feed management; 6) health aspects and their implications on feed management; and 7) feed quality – lack of regulatory mechanisms. A comprehensive set of recommendations was developed to overcome the constraints that were identified, and it is anticipated that these recommendations will guide FIRA’s future work in this arena. The workshop proceedings and recommendations, invited reviews, case studies and syntheses will form the basis for an FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper entitled “On-farm feeding and feed management in aquaculture” which will be published in due course.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Asian livestock. Challenges, opportunities and the response.
    Proceedings of an international policy forum held in Bangkok, Thailand, 16-17 August 2012
    2012
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    Growing populations, rising disposable incomes and progressive urbanization in Asia and the Pacific region have spurred rapid growth in the consumption of animal source foods. The region has generated more than half the gains in global livestock production since the early 1990s and this growth is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. However, the manner of supply growth has also imposed considerable social, health and ecological costs. Signs of resource stress are now becoming visible and are raising new challenges for the food and nutrition security of the poor. There are also growing concerns of real and potential marginalization of small producers in the process, resulting in missed opportunities for supporting rural livelihoods. Climate change, water scarcity, land degradation and increased resource competition for food, feed and fuel production pose major additional challenges for the sector in the long run. The environmental and natural resource implications of livestoc k production have come under intense public scrutiny in recent years and the debate on climate change has been particularly passionate. Similarly, in view of the widespread prevalence of a number of production-limiting and trade-preventing diseases in the region and growing health concerns resulting from zoonotic and food-borne diseases, support for the development of policies and response systems for enhancing food safety and minimizing disease burdens is another area that is receiving growing attention. To discuss these issues, promote collaboration and knowledge exchange among relevant national and international agencies and discover ways of addressing future challenges, FAO and partner organizations convened the Regional Livestock Policy Forum in Bangkok, Thailand from 16 to17 August 2012. This publication provides the proceedings of the forum including technical papers presented. The presentations on good practices were video recorded and the video links are indicated in Annexure 1.

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