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Resilient islands, resilient communities - Kiribati










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Boosting the domestic tuna value chain in Kiribati 2022
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    The ocean surrounding Kiribati is a precious source for the population livelihoods: it provides employment, source of income and healthy food. Kiribati has one of the highest per capita consumption of fish in the world with around 77 kg/capita. In the last years the fisheries sector in Kiribati has shown constant growth, particularly in capture fisheries where tuna catches have greatly contributed up to representing about 99 percent of the total. The factsheet provides an overview of the tuna fisheries in Kiribati and highlights how the FAO project “Sustainable Fish Value Chain for Small Island Developing States (SVC4SIDS)” is working to improve opportunities and enhance sustainable development and competitiveness of its associated value chain.
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    Book (series)
    Community-level socio-ecological vulnerability assessments in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem 2015
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    Climate change is considered one of the most critical challenges facing the planet and humankind. It poses a key threat to marine ecosystems and fisheries resources as well as communities that depend on these systems for food and livelihoods. Understanding the vulnerability of these socio-ecological systems to climate change, and their capacity to adapt, has become the focus of several climate change and fisheries projects and programmes in recent years and, increasingly, researchers and practit ioners recognise that actions supporting adaptive capacity building have to be grounded in local needs and experiences and thus vulnerability assessments should be participatory and inclusive. A good understanding of local vulnerabilities, including local perceptions of the multiple drivers of change, historic and customary adaptation strategies, and existing capacity within local institutions and amongst individuals, should be used as building blocks for strengthening resilience and identifying appropriate adaptation strategies. Participatory vulnerability assessment is an approach that facilitates better understanding of the extent to which a socio-ecological system (e.g. coastal fishery system) is susceptible to various socio-ecological changes (including the effects of climate change) and the system’s capacity to cope with and adapt to these changes from the viewpoint of the local communities. This analysis will help countries, partner agencies and their staff, researchers and fish eries professionals in understanding how to define and measure vulnerability within complex fisheries systems, using perceptions-based approaches within fishing communities in the Benguela Current region (Angola, Namibia, South Africa) as an example. Ultimately, the scope of this work is to improve resilience of fisheries systems and dependent communities to multiple drivers of change including climate change and ocean acidification.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Restoration of productive aquatic ecosystems by small-scale fisheries and aquaculture communities in Asia
    Good practices, innovations and success stories
    2022
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    This report showcases examples of actions taken by small-scale fishers and aquaculture farmers in Asia to restore the productivity of aquatic ecosystems. Small-scale fishers and fish farmers include some of the world’s most marginalized and impoverished people groups, yet their harvests account for over half of the world’s aquatic food production. The marine, coastal and freshwater ecosystems their livelihoods depend upon are degraded from human impacts and further at risk from climate change. Ecosystem restoration actions by fisherfolk communities can revitalize the socio-ecological services and sustain progress over time. Both passive and active restoration approaches are being employed across Asia’s marine, coastal and inland waterways. Fishers, fish farmers, and fishworkers’ restorative actions are focused on increasing the sustainability of their operations. Common approaches include eliminating destructive fishing, reducing overfishing through gear changes and effort control, restoring connectivity of floodplains and fish migration pathways, integrated aquaculture and rice-farming practices, re-stocking of native fisheries, and actively rehabilitating and / or re-establishing habitats. Progress is measurable through a diverse array of environmental, socio-economic and governance related metrics. Changes in fisheries catches, ecological connectivity, water quality, habitat diversity and structure, and fish consumption provide important measures of biodiversity gains (or losses). Common enablers of success include economic incentives, co-management and legal recognition of fishing rights, highly engaged fisherfolk cooperatives or community groups, women’s leadership and development, and community partnerships with stakeholders that focus on enabling fisherfolk’s own goals for sustainable livelihoods. Ecosystem restoration activities have not lasted when these enablers are insufficiently attended to and when environmental aspects of project feasibility, such as the choice of rehabilitation locations and / or species, are poorly planned. Successes in ecosystem restoration by fisherfolk can and are being scaled out to neighbouring communities and countries. Key to this is the sharing of stories, lessons learned and tools through south-south partnerships, learning exchanges, and women’s groups. Simple, low-cost tools and actions have enabled long-term engagement by small-scale fishers in sustainable operations. More complex actions, such as the uptake of integrated aquaculture systems, are also enabling stepwise changes in ecosystem restoration. By sharing stories from different ecosystems, fisheries, and geographies, this report seeks to help fisherfolk and their partners glean from one another and achieve faster progress in ecosystem restoration.

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