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Report of the Workshop on Extension Service Requirements in Small-Scale Fisheries. BOBP/REP/6









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Workshop on Social Feasibility in Small-Scale Fisheries Development. BOBP/REP/5 1980
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    The definition of small-scale fisheries used at the workshop was the definition put forward at the Expert Consultation on Small-Scale Fisheries Development (Rome, 1975) - “Small-scale fisheries are labour-intensive and are conducted by artisanal craftsmen whose level of income, mechanical sophistication, quantity of production, fishing range, political influence, market outlets, employment and social mobility and financial dependence keep them subservient to the economic decisions and operating constraints placed upon them by those who buy their production”. In defining social feasibility, it was generally agreed that a project is socially feasible if its benefits reach the intended beneficiaries. Presentations by workshop participants of the socio-economic status of fishing communities in the Bay of Bengal region showed that they live in overcrowded houses in villages in the coastal areas, exposed to floods, fires and storms. Their income and educational levels are low, as is thei r status in society. Drinking water is hard to come by, basic sanitation facilities are non-existent. Some of the fisher-folk are migrants, some are temporary occupants of land, some hold short-term leases, some are tenants, a few are owners. The power structure in the fishing villages is related to the ownership of such assets as land, houses, boats and fishing gear. The fishing communities have little or no political power, are strongly influenced by religion, and tend to be highly superstitio us. Women from the fishing community are not active partners in actual fishing operations, but they do play an active role in fish marketing and processing.
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    Project
    Boatbuilding Materials for Small-Scale Fisheries in India - BOBP/WP/9 1980
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    This paper summaries a study on the availability and prices of materials used to construct the hulls of fishing craft for the important small-scale fisheries of the East Coast of India. The paper should be of interest to development planners, legislators and administrators. Builders of fishing craft, suppliers of materials, and owners and prospective owners of fishing craft may also find useful the information on trends in prices and availability of boatbuilding materials and the possibilities o f alternative materials. The study covered the following boatbuilding materials: timber for kattumarams and boats; fibre-reinforced plastics; ferrocement; steel; and aluminium, which is used forsheathing wooden hulls and is also a construction material in its own right. The study was carried out by Matsyasagar Consultancy Services Private Limited under contract to the Programme for the Development of Small-Scale Fisheries in the Bay of Bengal, GCP/RAS/040/SWE (usually abbreviated to th e Bay of Bengal Programme). The Programme is executed by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) and funded by the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA). The main aims of the Bay of Bengal Programme are to develop and demonstrate technologies by which the conditions of small-scale fishermen and the supply of fish from the small-scale sector may be improved, in five of the countries bordering the Bay of Bengal — Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka an d Thailand.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Fisheries Extension Services for Coastal Provinces: Learnings from a Project in Ranong, Thailand - BOBP/REP/68 1994
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    This report describes the process, achievements and learnings of a subproject which set out to develop a model for enabling integrated development in selected fishing communities in the Ranong Province of Thailand. While actually providing the services, it was intended to learn simultaneously about the approaches and methods of fisheries extension services that target small-scale fisherfolk communities in coastal provinces. The subproject was conceptualized late in 1985, towards the end of the f irst phase of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP), and was to be implemented during the second phase of BOBP which started in 1987. Several preparatory exercises were undertaken during 1985 and 1986 and the implementation of the project initiated late in 1986. The subproject undertook several activities, including technology transfer in the areas of aquaculture and capture fisheries, it provided credit through revolving funds for various fisheries and nonfisheries activities, it promoted ski ll development among women in the hope of enhancing their incomes, it facilitated access to health education and healthcare in remote villages, it helped in the provision of nonformal education, and it enabled fishing communities to gain access to community development programmes of the Government. It even helped some of the villages to create some infrastructure. It finally spent time on trying to extract the learnings from its work and on sharing this learning with the Department of Fisheries (DOF). The Department of Fisheries of Thailand was responsible for the execution of the subproject, and it did so with the cooperation of the government departments responsible for healthcare, non-formal education, cooperatives and community development. The BOBP provided technical assistance, support for some additional staff, training, equipment, credit and monitoring.

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