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Turning rice residues into energy in combined heat and power systems in Turkey

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    Bioenergy and food security (BEFS) assessment – Seychelles 2022
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    A sustainable and stable energy supply is essential for a country’s stability and wellbeing. Seychelles, like many small island developing states (SIDS), currently depends on imported energy, in the form of fossil fuels. The high dependence on fossil fuel imports means Seychelles is highly vulnerable to disruptions in global markets. The situation is exacerbated by a reliance on imported food, which accounts for about 70 percent of food consumption. To limit this dependence, it is aiming to increase its reliance on renewable energy to 15 percent by 2030, with a long-term ambition of using 100 percent renewable sources for electricity production. Sustainable bioenergy is one form of renewable energy that can be used to green a country’s energy mix. This Sustainable Bioenergy Assessment report for Seychelles looks at the potential for sustainable bioenergy within the country, considering the country context, conditions and delicate habitat. The report considers sustainable biomass sources from the agriculture, forestry and waste sectors. The assessment was conducted following the bioenergy and food security (BEFS) approach of FAO, and identifies a number of bioenergy pathways relevant for the country. Within the report, the different forms of biomass, their availability and viability are assessed. Livestock, crop and forestry residues, and the biodegradable portion of waste, otherwise destined for landfill, are among the sources of biomass considered. The use of these biomass types and amounts are then assessed from a technical and economic point of view, under different price scenarios, for the production of energy.
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    Establishing residue supply chains to reduce open burning – The case of rice straw and renewable energy in Punjab, India 2022
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    Open burning of crop residues in India is a serious issue that not only impacts human health but is also detrimental to soil health in the long term. According to the estimates from the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, about 500 million tonnes of crop residues are generated annually. While a portion of these residues is used for various purposes, a larger portion is burnt in the fields. The problem seems to be specifically severe in Punjab where a large quantity of rice straw is nurnt after harvesting rice to prepare the field quickly and cheaply for wheat cultivation. It is in this background that the project aimed to support the local government in Punjab and the national government of India to use rice straw productively and avoid open burning. Rice straw is a useful resource that can be used in-situ to maintain soil fertility as well as ex-situ to produce value added products including energy. However, a key challenge in using crop residues, including rice straw, is to mobilize it in systematically. This report presents a model crop residue value chain that can support the collection, transport, storage of rice straw which can enable productive uses of rice straw. Moreover, it estimates the quantity of rice straw produced in each district in Punjab and further estimates the investment needed in developing a crop residue supply chain in the state. Finally, it also undertakes a techno-economic assessment of energy technlogies to identify the most profitable way to use rice straw to produce sustainable energy.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The small-scale fisheries and energy nexus
    Opportunities for renewable energy interventions
    2023
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    Renewable sources of energy are gaining traction worldwide. Solar, wind power, biomass energy and geothermal heat energy are already used in applications in food value chains. Renewable energy can provide energy solutions in situations where there are challenges with traditional energy supplies. Renewable energy also has the capacity to reduce the carbon footprint of food value chains and help mitigate against climate change. Yet, the link between renewable energy and small-scale fisheries and aquaculture is not well documented. This publication introduces the current situation and proposes a way forward with regard to the use of renewable energy in small-scale fisheries. It provides general guidance for decision-makers and development specialists on the choices, benefits and challenges related to renewable energy use and uptake in small-scale fisheries. The publication will contribute to the implementation of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF) and the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Alleviation (SSF Guidelines). FAO’s objectives relate to better production, better nutrition and a better environment.

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