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Report of the Workshop on Climate Proofing Aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa: Review of Policies and Production Systems for Climate Change Resilience, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 9-10 June 2016











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    Climate change vulnerability in fisheries and aquaculture 2015
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    Global reviews of the impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture systems carried out in 2009 revealed a paucity and patchiness of information concerning climate impacts on the sector. Six follow-up regional case studies were then launched by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in an attempt to start filling the gaps and to provide direction and initial steps in adaptation planning. Fisheries and aquaculture systems were selected across the globe to allow for diversity. The approach of the case studies followed a template allowing them to: (i) define vulnerability to climate change by understanding potential impacts on the system, the sensitivity of the system to such changes and the current adaptive capacity; (ii) identify gaps in existing knowledge in assessing the vulnerability of the system; (iii) identify potential strategies for reducing vulnerability to climate change; and (iv) provide policy guidance in reducing system vulnerability. The objective of this publication is to consolidate, further interpret, refine and draw conclusions from the information gathered on climate change impacts, sensitivity and adaptive capacity of fish production systems in the diverse and geographically distinct social-ecological systems covered by the six case studies. Although the specificity of each case study and the complexity of vulnerability prevent a generalization of issues and the drawing of broad conclusions, the present document captures common threads from a close examination of the exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity of the systems considered. Information on these three characteristics of vulnerability is particularly relevant to policy-makers, development practitioners and members of the academic community concerned with the impacts of climate change on aquatic resources and the communities and economies they support. It can be used to identify areas in which interventions, policy development and/or further research a re needed to better equip these systems and their stakeholders to reduce their vulnerability and enhance their adaptation to long-term climate-induced changes. It can also be used as a benchmark against which improvements in capacity may be measured or monitored over time.
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    Report of the FAO/PaCFA Expert Workshop on Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability in Fisheries and Aquaculture: Available Methodologies and their Relevance for the Sector
    Windhoek, Namibia, 8–10 April 2013
    2013
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    The purpose of the global Expert Workshop on Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability in Fisheries and Aquaculture: Available Methodologies and their Relevance for the Sector was to review latest stages in research on, and the application of, climate variability and change vulnerability methodologies. It also provided an opportunity to begin a common reflection on what role these methodologies can have in planning policies and strategies to best cope with climate change impacts on fisheries and aq uaculture. Making the link between expert advice and practical use of vulnerability methodologies from around the globe set the scene for fruitful discussions on how to make the best use of the existing information, how to prioritize the filling of gaps and how to develop a common understanding on the effectiveness of such knowledge in relation to policy and management actions and programmes. As vulnerability methodologies are a function of different factors (vulnerability of what and of whom to what), the workshop required experts from across the natural and social sciences disciplines and from both inland and marine capture fisheries and aquaculture. These examined current methodologies for conducting vulnerability assessments and provided best practices on how to develop and undertake a vulnerability assessment for incorporation into the design of adaptation programmes in fisheries and aquaculture in the face of climate change.
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    Gap analysis of national and regional fisheries and aquaculture priorities and initiatives in Western and Central Africa in respect to climate change and disasters
    FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular No. 1094
    2014
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    African fishers and fish farmers are particularly vulnerable to disasters and climate change impacts. The objective of the study was to identify regional and national gaps and opportunities to reduce the vulnerability of the sector to impacts from climate change and increase the resilience of fisheries and aquaculture livelihoods to disasters. The identification of gaps and opportunities were made through a combination of a survey, website searches and reviews of documents – including policies a nd strategies – that contain fisheries/aquaculture and climate change adaptation (CCA)/disaster risk management (DRM) aspects. Identified national and regional priorities were compared to actions in place and thus gaps were identified. A total of 23 countries, 16 of which are least developed countries (LDCs), were considered for Western and Central Africa. A regional workshop on climate change, disasters and crises in the fisheries and aquaculture sector in Western and Central Africa was held in Accra, Ghana on 1–2 November 2012 to provide input into the gap analysis process and provide recommendations for addressing climate change adaptation and disaster risk management in fisheries and aquaculture. Overall, 27 gaps or recommendations were identified. These are presented in Chapter 4, with reference to their source and in respect to the four areas of adaptation and disaster risk management action, namely: strengthened governance to address disasters and climate change impacts affectin g fisheries and aquaculture; addressing and reducing underlying risks through prevention and adaptation measures; managing effective response and improving preparedness for disasters and climate change; and  improved early warning systems and availability of information. These gaps and recommendations provide specific and general suggestions for those considering supporting the development of actions in the area of fisheries/aquaculture and CCA/DRM in Western and Central Africa. The findings w ill also be used to inform advice for the formulation of the Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa.

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