Thumbnail Image

Integration of Aquaculture into the Farming Systems in India










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Technical Assistance to Develop GCF Climate Resilience Project in Kagera and Geita Regions of Tanzania - TCP/URT/3708 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Government of the United Republic of Tanzania estimates that nearly 35 percent of households in Kagera and Geita regions lives below the basic needs poverty line, with some districts within these regions ranked among the poorest in the country Most production is for subsistence, with farmers’ households generally living season to season, with very small risk margins and little resilience to weather and climate related shocks Agriculture, including the crops and livestock subsector contributes over 87 percent of the country’s regional Gross Domestic Product ( Of the total population of approximately 4 million in the regions, more than 3 5 million residents rely on agriculture for their livelihoods Almost all agriculture and farming in the regions is rainfed and climate change has been intensifying the variability of rainfall patterns, affecting the sector seriously The profound impacts of climate change in Kagera and Geita regions are already causing relatively more intense and wider damage to at risk communities and agro ecosystems, compared with other regions in the country.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Conserving the Agrobiodiversity heritage of the Koraput Region, India and Establishment of a Genetic Heritage Park. Format for Proposals of Candidate Systems for the Globally-important Ingenious Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) Programme
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2016
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Koraput region of the state of Orissa in India is known for its ecological wealth coexisting with poverty, generally referred to as the paradox of economic poverty in the midst of genetic prosperity. Koraput is a tribal district; more than 70% of the total population comprises of scheduled tribes. There are as many as 52 tribal groups in this district. The socio-economic indicators in these areas are comparable to the worst in the world with the percentage of people below the poverty line rangi ng from 72% to 83%. The genetic repository of the region is of great significance in the global context. About 79 plant angiosperm species and one gymnosperm are endemic to the region. Despite the genetic richness and poverty in plenty, no significant effort has been undertaken in the region to overcome the prevailing dichotomy between resource richness and rural poverty. The system could well be designed to provide opportunity for developing efficient people centred, pro-nature, pro-poor and pr o-women oriented programmes in the region that could bring in rural prosperity and ensuring a long term biohapinness for the people and the region. The unique features of the system assumes global importance and initiatives need to be in place for local people to be a part of the conservation and, sustainable and equitable use of the bioresources which they have been bestowed with.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Vulnerability of mountain peoples to food insecurity
    Updated data and analysis of drivers
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This study, the third of its type published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), adds further evidence that in mountain regions of developing countries, food insecurity, social isolation, environmental degradation, exposure to the risk of disasters and to the impacts of climate change, and limited access to basic services, especially in rural areas, are still prevalent and, under some circumstances, increasing. It also shows the technical challenges for producing more comprehensive and representative assessments based on scientific data, and providing a deeper understanding of the underlying factors of vulnerability of mountain people. Mountains cover 39 million km2, or 27 percent, of the world’s land surface. In 2017, the global mountain population reached nearly 1.1 billion, which is 15 percent of the world’s population, with an increase of 89 million people since 2012. The increase added almost entirely (86 million people) to the mountain population in developing countries, which reached one billion people in 2017. The population has increased in all the regions of the developing world. Only the areas at the highest mountain altitudes (above 3 500 m) continued to experience a depopulation trend in the last 17 years, while at all other elevations population increased. In all African subregions, in South America and in Central and Western Asia, the population density is higher in the mountains than in the lowlands. In developing countries, 648 million people (65 percent of the total mountain population) live in rural areas. Half of them – 346 million – were estimated to be vulnerable to food insecurity in 2017. In other words, one in two rural mountain dwellers in developing countries live in areas where the daily availability of calories and protein was estimated to be below the minimum threshold needed for a healthy life. In the five years from 2012 to 2017, the number of vulnerable people increased in the mountains of developing countries, approximately at the same pace as the total mountain population. Although the proportion of vulnerable people to the total mountain population did not change, the absolute number of vulnerable people increased globally by 40 million, representing an increment of 12.5 percent from 2012 to 2017.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.