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Emergency Response to Enhance Technical Capacity for Early Warning, Monitoring and Management of Fall Army Worm in Yemen - TCP/YEM/3701









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    Emergency Response to Enhance Technical Capacity for Early Warning, Monitoring and Management of Fall Armyworm in Myanmar - TCP/MYA/3706 2020
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    Fall Armyworm ( is a transboundary pest that is native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas It was first detected in Central and Western Africa in early 2016 and now poses a threat to crop production around the world The FAW larva ( is known to feed on over 80 crop species, several of which are major crops in Myanmar, including maize, rice, sorghum, millet, sugar cane, various vegetables and cotton Moreover, developing larvae target different areas of the host crop, depending both on their own developmental phase and the stage of crop development Notably, young larvae feed on leaves, which results in “windowing This can ultimately lead to “dead heart” in maize, which prevents cob formation. The FAW infestation in Myanmar is primarily affecting smallholder maize farmers that have limited to no experience with the pest and few resources to manage its spread Moreover, FAW poses a threat to cropping systems and food security throughout Myanmar because of its high potential to adapt to alternative crops, including rice As the adult moth can travel over 100 kilometres a night, the potential for largescale and widespread infestation is an immediate concern Given the prevailing risk to national food and livelihood security, farmers require urgent support in the sustainable management of FAW through an integrated pest management (IPM) approach.
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    Emergency Response to Enhance the National Capacity of Egypt for Early Warning, Monitoring and Management of Fall Armyworm - TCP/EGY/3706 2022
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    Native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, the Fall Armyworm ( is a transboundary pest that travels great distances very quickly and feeds on a variety of crops, including maize, rice, sorghum and sugar cane The FAW was detected in West Africa for the first time in 2016 and within a few years, it had spread to almost all the countries in sub Saharan Africa Its presence was first reported in maize fields in Egypt in May 2019 Owing to the speed with which it spreads and the fact that it can feed on so many different plants, the FAW has the potential to devastate yields and damage crops in Egypt, thereby dramatically affecting food security and threatening the livelihoods of smallholder farmers This project was designed to build the capacities of a variety of stakeholders, including staff of the Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation ( and smallholder farmers, to identify, monitor and control the spread of FAW in Egypt through awareness raising, training programmes the implementation of Integrated Pest Management ( strategies and the provision of equipment.
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    Support to Enhance Preparedness for Fall Armyworm Invasion among Countries - TCP/INT/3705 2023
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    Fall armyworm ( is a noctuid moth native to the Americas, which is considered a pest due to the substantial agricultural damage it can cause Its larvae feed on over 80 crop species, including maize, rice, sorghum, millet, sugarcane, cotton, and various vegetable species, thus posing a threat to vital rural economies The FAW was reported in Africa for the first time in early 2016 in West and Central African countries and rapidly spread throughout sub Saharan Africa, causing significant agricultural and economic losses The emergence of the FAW was confirmed in India and Yemen in July 2018 and was later reported in Bangladesh Sri Lanka, and Thailand by 2019 A decline in agricultural productivity jeopardizes not only food security but also the livelihoods of farmers Because of crop trade and the moth's remarkable flying capacity, the FAW has the potential to spread to further countries, posing a major risk to crop production, particularly cereals In light of this, many countries have requested assistance to fight against the spread of the FAW and acquire management techniques, as well as monitoring and surveillance for early detection FAO initiated the Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control 2019 2022 as an urgent response to the rapid spread of the FAW This initiative assists smallholder farmers, their associations, public institutions, national governments, and development partners in responding rapidly to FAW infestation In this regard, FAO created a free mobile application for real time FAW monitoring, the fall armyworm monitoring and early warning system ( The Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control has established a global coordination structure to foster an open and collaborative dialogue towards achieving science based solutions This coordination structure is composed of a steering committee ( a working group on resource mobilization ( a technical committee ( and seven technical working groups ( In addition, national task forces ( were created at country levels FAO's Plant Production and Protection Division ( provides technical leadership through the FAW Secretariat, in collaboration with the International Plant Protection Convention ( Secretariat This approach allows all stakeholders, scientists, and governments to interactively discuss challenges and propose solutions that are tailored to each country The project took part in these coordination efforts and sought to assist newly infested countries in taking immediate action in response to the emergence of the FAWFall armyworm ( is a noctuid moth native to the Americas, which is considered a pest.

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