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Crop residues and agro-industrial by-products in West Africa








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    Booklet
    Ethiopia | Availability and utilization of agroindustrial by-products as animal feed | 2018 2019
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    One of the major constraints for the very low production and productivity of livestock in Ethiopia is the poor quality and inadequate quantity of available feed. Agro-industrial by-products (AIBPs) can play an important role in meeting the widely prevalent feed shortage in the country. The AIBPs are usually less fibrous, rich in energy and/or protein contents. They have high digestibility and energy values compared with other classes of feed resources. The major AIBPs produced in Ethiopia include by-products from flour millings, sugar factories, edible oil processing factories, breweries, and abattoirs. These by-products play a vital role in the feeding of livestock mainly in urban and peri-urban livestock systems. The spatial and temporal availability of AIBPs in different parts of Ethiopia has not been quantified. Information on the utilization of such resources is also scanty. Data on availability of these resources is important for developing and using appropriate feeding strategies, improving livestock production and productivity, enhancing the efficiency of AIBPs utilization, decreasing burden on the environment and promoting technologies that further circular economy. This study was aimed at assessing the spatial and temporal availability of major AIBPs and their use as livestock feed. Information on storage and transport of these by-products has also been recorded with the aim to identify ‘hotspots’ at which the wastage takes place, and to suggest ways to reduce it.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Agricultural Transformation Centres in Africa - Practical guidance to promote inclusive agro-industrial development 2019
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    Over the next ten years, the African rural space will be the theatre of profound changes as the activities envisaged for agricultural transformation are drastically scaled up. Increased food demand and changing consumption habits driven by demographic factors, such as population growth and urbanization, are already leading to a rapid increase of net food imports, opening a huge opportunity for the agribusiness sector of many African countries. Against this backdrop and in line with its mission to spur sustainable economic development and social progress, the African Development Bank (AfDB) in 2016 launched Feed Africa, a strategy that is intended to contribute substantially to the transformation of African agriculture by 2025, and to reverse Africa’s dependence on imported foods. As part of this strategy, AfDB is promoting the concept of staple crops processing zones (SCPZs), which are agrobased spatial development initiatives, designed to concentrate agro-processing activities within areas of high agricultural potential to boost productivity and integrate the production, processing and marketing of selected commodities. As essential components, SCPZs include an agro-processing hub, a number of agricultural transformation centres (ATCs) and agricultural production areas. The ATCs are designed to link smallholder farmers to the agro-processing hub and are centres strategically located in high production areas, with the aim of serving as aggregation points to accumulate products from the community to supply the agro-processing hub for further value addition, or to send them to centres of great demand for distribution and retail to consumers. Under the technical support of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), this study has attempted to assess the feasibility and applicability of the ATC concept to selected regions in Zambia, Côte d’Ivoire and the United Republic of Tanzania. Findings from the field have demonstrated the potential of ATCs to address community needs and constraints for a range of selected value chains, and have helped to identify different ATCs models that could possibly work in each specific context.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Crop residue based densified total mixed ration – A user-friendly approach to utilise food crop 2012
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    Crop residues are valuable resources since they form a bulk of ruminant feed in many tropical countries. Due to lack of effective management of these resources, unfortunately they are being burnt in some countries, causing environmental pollution. The digestibility of crop residues and other low quality forages can be increased through the action of rumen microbes by strategically mixing nitrogen and minerals that are deficient in these feed resources. The increase in digestibility of crop resid ues and low quality forages, in turn also increases their intake. Both these phenomena enhance the efficiency of nutrient utilization from these feed resources in animal food chains. To achieve this, the present paper discusses a technology based on the formation of a complete diet in the form of densified feed blocks or pellets from straws mixed with minerals, oil seed cakes and other agroindustrial by-products. The methods for preparation of such total mixed rations, their use and impact have been presented. It is hoped that this technology will enhance income of farmers, decrease environmental pollution and help alleviate shortage of good quality feeds in tropical countries. In addition, the feed produced in the densified form as blocks or pellets could also provide complete feed to livestock in emergency situations. Public-private partnership is expected to enhance the application and impact of this technology.

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