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Riga: from food waste to healthy off-season food










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    Project
    Improving Rural Livelihoods and the Environment Through the Integral Utilization of Residues of Treated Waste Water and Organic Solid Waste for the Production of Renewable Energy and Compost in Mafraq Governorate of Jordan - TCP/JOR/3602 2020
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    As the Syrian crisis continues to escalate, the influx of refugees in neighbouring countries places an growing burden on affected areas. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) determined that Jordan hosts around 620 000 registered refugees, while the Government has estimated that there is a total of 1.4 million refugees in the country. In Mafraq, the refugee population lives in distress, while the broader population is also affected by the refugee influx. In December 2019, there were 75 993 individuals and 17 655 families registered at the Zaatari refugee camp. Stakeholders in the Zaatari community continue to pursue the creation of job opportunities for residents, with a record 13 220 active work permits being reached in October 2019. Although job opportunities are traditionally dominated by the agriculture sector, the waste sector offers potential for the development of additional “green” jobs. In Jordan, the level of municipal solid waste has grown rapidly over the past two decades, while the influx of refugees has exponentially increased its rate of production. Much of the solid waste produced finds its way to landfills, most of which are classified as unsanitary dump sites. On top of the strain being placed on the waste management system, the influx of refugees has also driven an increased demand for energy. This TCP project was therefore designed to make use of waste in the Zaatari municipality in the creation of sustainable job opportunities that promote compost production for agricultural purposes and the generation of energy.
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    Policy brief
    Food Waste Management in City Region Food System - Sri Lanka
    COLOMBO (SRI LANKA) Policy brief
    2018
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    About 60% of Sri Lanka’s municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated in its Western Province where the Colombo District contributes half (2100 t/day) and within the district the Colombo Municipal Council (CMC) 700 t/day or 10% of the national total. So far, CMC has not embarked on a larger holistic waste management strategy that includes reduce, reuse and recycle (RRR) approaches linking for example with the National Pilisaru project led by the CEA. Alternative locations for landfills are hard to find and there is an urgent need to discuss ways to reduce, recycle, recover and reuse in particular the large fraction of organic (food) waste. Based on stakeholder consultations and available research, it's recommended to 1) Streamline the MSW sector with an empowered umbrella body that coordinates integrating and implementing MSW management; 2) Create an enabling investment climate for private sector engagement in RRR; 3) Create an enabling environment at household level; 4) Link food waste generator and potential user; 5) Introduce by-laws to encourage food waste reduction in canteens and catering.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Urban stakeholder analysis for food waste prevention and reduction in Sri Lanka 2023
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    Mapping stakeholders and their potential roles for prevention and reduction of food waste (FW) supports a coherent, coordinated and complementary approach to quantification, causes identification, and scaling up of feasible solutions for significant returns on investment. State and non-state stakeholders were mapped in selected municipalities: Colombo metropolitan area (Colombo, Sri Jayewardenepura-Kotte, Negombo, Kaduwela, and Moratuwa Municipal council areas), Jaffna, Kandy, Batticoloa, Kurunegala, and Galle. Stakeholders were grouped into four clusters: producers, enterprises/food business operators, private/public/civil society organizations, and households. The stakeholders’ maps guided sensitization and capacity-building sessions whose conclusions fed into the preparation of the National Roadmap on Urban Food Waste Prevention and Reduction for Households, Food services, Retailers, and Wholesalers launched on 17 August 2021. According to the analysis, the institutions working on food and/or (bio-)waste can be divided into governmental, semi-governmental, private, and non-governmental. Food safety, quality control, and waste management in Sri Lanka is under the umbrella of the Central Government, Provincial Council (PC), and Local Authorities (LAs) that cover governance (e.g. policies and regulations), production, trade, input supply, services, welfare support, and research. However, duties and responsibilities are, sometimes, crosscutting and interrelated with overlaps that can lead to poor coordination. An array of institutions at central and provincial levels are engaged to strengthen the food production sector in Sri Lanka. The existing inter-institutional coordination mechanism could be improved. The coordination for knowledge generation and dissemination between national and provincial systems should be strengthened. The report was produced for the project "Innovative approaches to reduce, recycle, and reuse FW in urban Sri Lanka", implemented under the oversight of the Ministry of Urban Development and Housing, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) from June 2019 to August 2021.

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