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Logging Damage in Tropical High Forest. Forestry Development Project Sarawak

Working Paper No. 5. FO - MAL/76/008








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Literature Synthesis on Logging Impacts in Moist Tropical Forests
    GLOBAL FIBRE SUPPLY STUDY - Working Paper Series
    1997
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    Compiling information on forest harvesting intensity is essential to the discussion of sustainable forest management. This paper presents a bibliographic synthesis of important literature on logging impacts and reduced impact logging in tropical forests. The emphasis is on statistics which contribute to the Global Fibre Supply Study such as logging intensities, cutting cycles and harvesting waste, residual stand development and site damage in non-coniferous tropical forests. This review was th en used to provide background information for the modelling work explained in Working Paper No. 5 in this series.
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    Sustainable management of logged tropical forests in the Caribbean to ensure long-term productivity 2021
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    To facilitate sustainable management of logged forests in the Caribbean, forest authorities of Belize, Guyana, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago, jointly with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the University of Hamburg as a scientific partner, implemented the regional project “Ensuring Long-Term Productivity of Lowland Tropical Forests in the Caribbean” financed by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture. The main objective of the project was to support the sustainable management of logged forests to maintain productivity and prevent further degradation. For this purpose, extensive field studies were conducted in the project countries, which resulted in silvicultural recommendations presented in this publication. The project findings revealed that the application of general sustainable forest management protocols for tropical production forests that set limits on harvesting does not necessarily ensure sustained productivity if the composition and management of the residual stand are not considered. The ratio of the number of harvested trees to the remaining future crop trees can provide a simple indicator of the sustainability of harvest. If the current harvest exceeds the number of future crop trees, the harvest is not sustainable. As a rule of thumb, at least one, preferably two future crop trees per harvested tree should be retained for future use. Protection of future crop trees can be a simple and practical approach to prevent high grading and degradation of the forest growing stock. The importance of reduced impact logging to reduce unnecessary damage to the future crop trees and for sustainable forest management, in general, is stressed.
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    Article
    Allometric equation for estimating tree above ground biomass modified by ecological environmental factors in tropical dipterocarp forests
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Tropical Dipterocarp Forest (DF) plays an important role in mitigating climate change thanks to its carbon sequestration capacity. In order to estimate the CO2 absorption capacity of DF as a basis for the development of forest ecological services, a system of biomass equations is needed; while very few models for estimating biomass in DF have been published and have not yet reflected the impact of ecological environmental factors. The purpose of the study was to validate and select the best model for estimating tree above ground biomass (AGB, kg) in DF under the influence of ecological environmental factors, thereby improving the reliability. Twenty-eight 0.25 ha plots in the Central Highlands and one 1 ha plot in the Southeast ecoregion in Viet Nam were measured. A total of 329 trees were destructively sampled to obtain a dataset of AGB; Methods for developing equations were weighted nonlinear fixed/mixed models with/without random effects fit by Maximum Likelihood; Using K-fold cross validation with K = 10, we compared and selected the best model with and without ecological environmental factors. As a result, separate ecological environmental factors did not affect AGB, while the combination of the factors influences the AGB model through the form: AGB = AVERAGE × MODIFIER, AGB = a × Db ×WDd × exp (e2 × (P - 1502) + e3 × (BA - 12.62)) that was significantly more reliable than a model without these factors involved; where D (cm), WD (g / cm3), P (mm year-1) and BA (m2 ha-1) are the diameter at breast height, wood density, averaged annual rainfall and total basal area of forest stand, respectively. Keywords: above ground biomass, dipterocarp forest, ecological factor ID: 3473259

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