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An illustrated guide to the state of health of trees

Recognition and interpretation of symptoms and damage







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Field guide to the control of warmwater fish diseases in Central and Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia 2019
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    Due to the recent rapid development of freshwater aquaculture in the Caucasus Region, many new and previously known fish diseases have appeared. One of the most prominent features of the region’s aquaculture is that it is mostly based on the rearing of cyprinids, mainly the common carp (Cyprinus carpio), as well as a few other predatory fish species. As a result, this book focuses on the diseases that affect these and other important warmwater fish species. Although this field guide covers the diseases of warmwater fish of Central and Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia, it also draws upon the extensive knowledge base available for the countries of Central Europe and the former Soviet Union, as well as recent research findings from the Islamic Republic of Iran and from Turkey. The major warmwater fish species cultured in the region and their health status are discussed, and two major categories of disease are recognized: biotic and abiotic diseases. Although there are numerous biotic diseases, abiotic factors (e.g. lack of oxygen, temperature, feeding mistakes) remain the main cause of losses in aquaculture. The best practices for the field and laboratory examination of disease outbreaks are reviewed, and the importance of accurate and detailed data recording emphasized. Prevention as a key factor in avoiding the spread of disease is highlighted, and actions to prevent the spread of diseases between farms, regions, countries and continents are discussed. Possible methods for the treatment of each disease are reviewed; unfortunately, the chemicals available for use in aquaculture are now rather limited, as many of them are hazardous to both the environment and human health. Of the viral diseases discussed, spring viraemia of carp (SVC) and koi herpesvirus (KHV) pose the greatest threats to the world’s carp populations. Of the bacterial diseases, ulcer disease is still the main problem in carp culture, while among the parasites, Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, the cause of white spot disease, is among the most important. Exotic parasites such as various Thelohanellus species, as well as tapeworms belonging to the genera Bothriocephalus and Khawia, are responsible for a considerable amount of damage. Some diseases of unknown aetiology are also discussed.
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    Book (series)
    Recognizing rift valley fever 2003
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    Rift Valley fever is one of the most significant zoonotic disease problems in Africa. The occurrence of the highly fatal haemorrhagic human disease syndrome, similar to Ebola and other haemorrhagic fevers, generates a degree of panic among the human populations at risk. RVF is highly contagious for humans if animals are viraemic at the time of slaughtering. In susceptible livestock populations, it is responsible for large numbers of abortions and stillbirths. However, one of RVF’s greatest impacts is upon trade in livestock. Even if the disease tends to disappear after epizootics, livestock bans may last for several years, severely affecting the livelihood of pastoralists. This manual aims at helping staff from veterinary services and laboratories to recognize the disease rapidly when it occurs. It provides an overview of the disease, describes clinical signs and the most important differential diagnosis, and guides the user on how to proceed if a case of RV F is suspected. The manual is part of a series prepared by FAO’s Emergency System for Transboundary Animal and Plant Pests and Diseases (EMPRES) livestock unit, as an aid to emergency preparedness for the major transboundary diseases of livestock.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Monitoring and Surveillance of Cereals Pests, Diseases and Weeds
    Report from Central Asia 2012
    2012
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    Cereal crops in Central Asia are affected by a number of biotic stresses like diseases, pests and weeds as well as abiotic stresses – drought and high temperature. Climatic condition during the growing 2011-2012 season was not favourable for rusts and many other foliar diseases. In addition, damages by insect pests were significant, especially by Sunn pest, cereal leaf beetle and aphids.

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