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Globalization of food systems in developing countries: impact on food security and nutrition











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    Document
    City Region Food System Situational Analysis. Colombo, Sri Lanka FAO - Food for the Cities Programme
    Working Document
    2016
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    City region food systems (CRFS) encompass the complex network of actors, processes and relationships involved in food production, processing, marketing and consumption in a given geographical region. The CRFS approach advocates for strengthened connectivity between urban centres and surrounding areas –whether peri-urban or rural– for a fair rural development and well-managed urbanisation. At the same time, it fosters the development of resilient and sustainable food systems, smallholder agricult ure, sustainable rural and urban production, employment, improved livelihoods, and food and nutrition security for all. This report describes the first phase of the city region food system (CRFS) assessment. This phase consists of a descriptive assessment and appraisal of the local context and CRFS, primarily based on the analysis of secondary data, stakeholder interviews and consultations. It provides an overview and description of the local context (including the political and institutiona l environment) and its CRFS. It includes a definition of the geographical boundaries of the CRFS, an overview of its overall structure and characteristics, an analysis of how it functions, stock of baseline information and identified gaps, and, to the extent possible, an indication of general trends and critical issues relevant to increase the sustainability and resilience of the specific CRFS. These key issues will be further examined in the next project phases: in-depth assessment and policy planning phases. The situation analysis builds on secondary data. Secondary data includes information from spatial datasets, statistics, studies, institutional, policy and legal frameworks, and information obtained from local expert knowledge through stakeholder consultations, focus-group discussions and interviews. The Colombo Municipal Council, CMC, is the oldest local authority in Sri Lanka, which celebrated its 150th anniversary this year. Historically Colombo city has been the main c ommercial city in Sri Lanka; however recently accelerated modernization efforts have changed the traditional outlook of Colombo municipality. During recent years, Colombo city was heavily invested for its infrastructure development to make the city an urban tourist attraction. Because of the recent developments, Colombo city was ranked as the number one fast growing city in the world in 2015. Align with this modernization, more and more people are attracted to Colombo city and its peri-urban are as for living and as well as for business. According to latest census statistics, there are 2,324,349 people living in Colombo district with a population density of 3438, which is the highest in the country. Remarkably, from the country’s population, one tenth reside in Colombo district. Population in CMC and the population density are 0.65 m, 15000-18000 per sq. km respectively. Further, this population has a complex diversity with respect to their age, ethnic, religious, and income level compo sitions. Therefore, Colombo city probably has one of the diverse and complex food systems in Sri Lanka, which requires vastly different types of foods to feed the large population in a small and congested city. Conversely, there is hardly any agricultural farming and food production in CMC limits, which has created multiple dependencies to food system of the city.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    IFPRI 2017 Global Food Policy Report 2017
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    The 2017 Global Food Policy Report provides a comprehensive overview of major food policy developments and events. In this sixth annual report, leading researchers, policy makers, and practitioners review what happened in food policy, and why, in 2016 and look forward to 2017. This year’s report has a special focus on the challenges and opportunities created by rapid urbanization, especially in low- and middle-income countries, for food security and nutrition. Please note that the Global Food Policy Report is an IFPRI publication, with a contribution by FAO in the lead chapter, and which is re-published online with the permission of IFPRI.
    Please cite this document, using the recommended citation that is given on page iv of the publication.
    Users can also link to the GlobalFood Policy Report on the IFPRI site.
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    Booklet
    The role of social protection in strengthening local food systems and inclusive rural transformation
    A case study of the Kenya Home-grown School Meal Programme
    2023
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    Social protection programs can contribute towards food system transformation by targeting purposively one or multiple outcomes. At the 2021 Food Systems Summit, convened by the UN Secretary-General, Home Grown School Feeding programmes were considered as a game changer for strengthening local food systems globally. This case study analyzes and demonstrates how the Kenya Home-Grown School meal Programme interacts with and can have synergistic impacts on the key results of the food system: improving food security and nutrition, providing adequate livelihoods for farmers and food producers, and contributing to environmental sustainability. It identifies and proposes changes in the design of its cash modality, and the areas that require increased programmatic and structural investment, to realize its full potential through its multiple benefit pathways. It will lead to an Increased understanding by member countries, development partners, and FAO staff about the linkages between Home Grown School Feeding programmes and agri-food systems. Within FAO’s Strategic Framework, the paper contributes to Better Life 2 on Inclusive rural transformation by ensuring equal participation of and benefits to poor, vulnerable, and marginalized groups through implementation of targeted policies, strategies, and programmes. It is aligned with the achievement of the 2030 Agenda through SDGs 1(No poverty), 2(Zero Hunger) and 10 (Reduced Inequalities).

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