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AMICAF-Caraga 2013 Final Report October 2012 - December 2013









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    Use of Salt-Tolerant Rice Varieties to counteract impacts of sea surges and saltwater intrusion, Philippines 2013
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    There are 400 000 ha of coastal saline soils in the Philippines, of which 100 000 ha are in mangroves, 175 000 ha are in fishponds and 125 000 ha are idle. Due to changes in the climatic and other environmental factors / parameters, Bicol’s coastal region is undergoing and experiencing various changes in the cropping pattern. About 70 000 ha of rice production area in Bicol and Cagayan Valley are potentially affected by saline water intrusion, thereby needing special attention and improvement (PhilRice, 2001). Rice areas along the nipa palm in Rizal and Bagacay, are usually affected by saline intrusion. Farmers in these areas normally experienced low rice production, because the present rice varieties used are suitable for the increasing saline-stressed environment, especially during may (end of dry season) and in December. The wider dissemination of a selected salt tolerant variety, namely NSIC Rc-108, was tested in 3 pilot sites (Rizal and Bagacay, Gubat, Sorsogon) between June and October 2010 (wet season) in lowland irrigated farming systems in Bicol, the Philippines.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction into Agriculture
    A case study from Bicol Region, Philippines
    2013
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    The Philippines is one of the most disaster-prone countries worldwide. Bicol Region is regularly exposed to a variety of natural hazards including tropical storms, typhoons, droughts, drought spells, flash floods, floods, landslides and volcano eruptions, causing frequent destruction, damage and losses. Agriculture is among the most vulnerable sectors to extreme weather events and changing climate. People depending on agriculture are regularly facing the challenge to prot ect and maintain their livelihoods. This Disaster Risk Reduction project in Bicol Region aimed at (i) strengthening the institutional and technical capacities, risks related services’ provision and coordination in agriculture to better prepare for and manage climate-related risks, and (ii) enhancing the risk reduction capacities and livelihood resilience of farmers and fisher folks, who are highly vulnerable to risks and extreme climatic events. The project was designed in accordance with FAO’s Disaster Risk Reduction for Food and Nutrition Security Framework Programme which builds on and supports the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005–2015 from the perspective of agriculture and food and nutrition security. This technical summary report presents results and lessons from the project.
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    Report of the Stakeholder Workshop on the GEF Climate Resilient Fisheries and Aquaculture Development Project in Bangladesh. Dhaka, Bangladesh, 29 - 30 August 2012 2013
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    The workshop was hosted jointly by WorldFish and the Department of Fisheries (DOF) Bangladesh, with financial assistance from FAO. The 60 workshop participants were policy-makers, professionals and practitioners. Presentations covered the understanding of climate change impacts and fisheries, adaptation for fisheries and aquaculture to the adverse impacts of climate change (CC) in the context of Bangladesh, and the process of Project Identification Form (PIF) development to access global funds f or CC adaptation for the least-developed countries. A dozen presentations focused on: (i) CC impacts on fisheries and aquaculture; (ii) global perspective and adaptation funding opportunities; (iii) CC impacts on fisheries and aquaculture in Bangladesh; (iv) CC hotspots in Bangladesh and fisheries; (v) current efforts by government and other actors in addressing CC and fisheries; and (vi) Global Environment Facility (GEF) fisheries project proposal development (PIF) and next steps. Workshop disc ussions largely focused on CC impacts on fisheries and aquaculture systems, especially some CC-related hotspots (e.g. the coastal zone and haor basins). Participants emphasized the need to enhance understanding of CC impacts through conducting adaptive research on different CC hotspots. They also recommended possible interventions to adapt to CC threats. Sea-level rise, salinity intrusion, cyclones, drought, erratic rainfall, flash flooding and sedimentation were identified as the key CC-related threats to fisheries and aquaculture. Major recommendations included improvement of fisheries-related national policies and strategies by incorporating CC issues, including capacity building of DOF and communities dependent on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. Discussion also revolved around development of CC-resilient technologies for aquaculture and fisheries management for the CC hotspots in Bangladesh. Based on the workshop recommendations, a PIF for the adaptation of Banglad esh fisheries and aquaculture to CC will be developed with three components: (i) climate-resilient fisheries sector and relevant national capacity development; (ii) strengthening knowledge and awareness of fisheries/aquaculture-dependent communities facing the adverse impacts of CC; and (iii) enhancing local adaptive capacity to support climate-resilient fisheries/aquaculture management and alternative livelihoods in the face of CC.

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