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Typology of the players involved in the forest private sector










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    Book (series)
    Professionalizing farmer organizations through private sector-led models
    Capacity development initiatives in Cameroon and Côte d’Ivoire
    2021
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    Investing in farmers – or agriculture human capital – is crucial to addressing challenges in our agri-food systems. A global study carried out by the FAO Investment Centre and the International Food Policy Research Institute, with support from the CGIAR Research Programme on Policies, Institutions and Markets and the FAO Research and Extension Unit, looks at agriculture human capital investments, from trends to promising initiatives. One of the nine featured case studies, funded by the Agribusiness Market Ecosystems Alliance with support from IFAD, explores three private sector-led initiatives focusing on the capacity development of farmer organizations in Côte d’Ivoire and Cameroon. These farmer organizations purchase cocoa or cotton from around 275 000 small producer members and sell to major exporting companies (off-takers). Independent assessments of the farmer organizations linked to the modularized agribusiness leadership training curriculum help make the farmer organizations stronger business partners, posing less risk for off-takers, their members and other value chain actors. With stronger links to markets and services, the farmer organizations can help farmers access finance, inputs and know-how, while also linking them to new productivity enhancing technology. This publication is part of the Country Investment Highlights series under the FAO Investment Centre's Knowledge for Investment (K4I) programme.
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    Policy Brief 8. Payment for environmental services
    Policy Briefs on the management of natural resources and institutional strengthening for disaster risk reduction in the context of climate change
    2010
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    Two institutional mechanisms for managing watersheds have been increasingly adopted worldwide: Payments for Environmental Services (PES) and Compensation for Environmental Services (CES). Their adoption is based on the increasing awareness that upstream activities determine the quality and quantity of the environment downstream. Their rationale is the need to provide incentives to help guarantee the provision of these services. The creation of such incentives needs, however, to avoid the risk of transforming them, and water in particular into a commodity, to the point where emerging private rights may be detrimental to the basic rights and livelihood opportunities of the rural populations. On the contrary, these financial schemes could play a leading role in the improvement of livelihoods of upstream smallholders, whenever they attract financial resources for an appropriate management of local watershed resources. In the tropical Andes, for centuries, the farmers have developed their o wn adaptive strategies to climate variability, thus making valuable contributions to the sustainable management of natural resources. Recognizing these contributions, some of these modern financial schemes prefer to be casted as “compensations” instead of “payments”.
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    Article
    Enhancing public-private sector collaboration: A case of the Uganda Timber Growers Association affiliated tree growers and public actors building a sustainable commercial forestry industry
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Uganda’s forests are a treasured natural asset contributing 8.7% to the national economy (NEMA 2011). However, Uganda has been losing its forest cover alarmingly, from 24% in 1990 to 9% in 2015. In Uganda, Forestry is coordinated by the Ministry of Water and Environment through the Forest Sector Support Department. Government through the National Forestry Authority has provided land in degraded Central Forest Reserves (CFRs) to private investors under license. Nearly 70% of planted forests are in CFRs. Additionally; Government initiatives like the Sawlog Production Grant Scheme project is providing financial and technical support based on a set of national Forestry standards. Finally, Government has created a conducive environment for the commercial forest sector to grow at an unprecedented rate of 7000 ha per year. Since 2004, the private sector in Uganda has been exemplary, on building a private sector-led commercial forestry industry. Most of the investors (99.8%) are small to medium scale (1000 ha and below). The private sector is coordinated by the Uganda Timber Growers Association (UTGA), the umbrella body of tree growers that does advocacy, networking, information sharing, collective procurement, marketing and extension. The private sector is growing over 85% (over 80,000 ha) of Uganda’s forest resource. UTGA has promoted the certification of plantations and chain of custody with area up to 42,000 ha, the largest in East Africa and two organizations certified in chain of custody. Plans are underway for the establishment of an apex body for carpenters, timber traders and wood processors. The strong collaboration between Government and private sector actors has yielded remarkable results for Uganda’s forestry. The public private partnerships have provided solutions to challenges of illegality, poor governance, forest degradation and deforestation by providing a platform for individuals, companies and communities to grow trees while protecting gazetted forest land. Keywords: Planted Forests, private sector, CFRs ID: 3487300

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