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Projecto de Protecção do Grande Ecossistema Marinho da Corrente das Canárias Programa de Acção Estratégico Sumário Executivo








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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in West Africa: a regional challenge 2020
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    The Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME), is made up of a set of varied marine and coastal ecosystems. It is characterized by one of the most productive upwelling ecosystems in the world, providing a vital reservoir of resources for much of North West Africa. Countries within the CCLME’s recognized boundaries extend from north to south: Morocco, the Canary Islands (Spain), Mauritania, The Gambia, Senegal, Cabo Verde, Guinea and Guinea-Bissau. The coastline of the region is estimated at 4 220 km from Morocco to Guinea. Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing in North West Africa is characterized inter alia by activities such as illegal transhipment, fish “laundering”, unauthorized fishing, gear use and/or prohibited techniques, excessive and/or prohibited bycatch, unauthorized or undeclared catches, and fishing in prohibited areas or during the prohibited season. IUU fishing has cost the CCLME countries of Mauritania, Senegal, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau and Guinea an estimated USD 2.3 billion per year between 2010 and 2016.
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    Document
    Protection of the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem Project Strategic Action Programme (SAP)
    CCLME
    2015
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    Seven countries in northwest Africa are working together through the CCLME Project to reverse the degradation of the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) and introduce an ecosystem approach to ocean governance. The countries are Cabo Verde, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania, Morocco, Senegal and The Gambia. Their objective is to introduce governance reforms and management interventions to address priority transboundary concerns, including declining fisheries resources, the degradation o f biodiversity and deteriorating water quality. The effective management of shared fish stocks is one of the greatest challenges countries of the CCLME region face. Thus, the project is promoting multi-country cooperation and co-management of shared stocks, with a view to achieving long-term, sustainable fisheries management.
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    Project
    Lutter contre la dégradation du grand écosystème marin du courant des Canaries - : GCP/INT/023/GFF 2020
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    Ranked third in the world in terms of primary productivity, the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) is an essential economic and food resource not only for the coastal populations of the region, but also for a large part of West Africa. However, it is under threat from overfishing, habitat degradation, pollution and climate change. The project aimed to reverse this trend and promote the resilience of the seven beneficiary countries (Cabo Verde, the Gambia, Guinea , Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Morocco and Senegal) in the face of the problems posed by the decline in fishing, biodiversity and water quality. Fostering synergies with regional initiatives, FAO coordinated the implementation of the project, which was executed jointly with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), in order to develop an integrated ecosystem approach to management at the regional level, and introduce reforms affecting governance, investment and management programmes.

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