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AGRICULTURAL TRADE POLICY AND FOOD SECURITY IN THE CARIBBEAN

structural issues, multilateral negotiations and competitiveness









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Proceedings of the Fiji/FAO 1997 Asia Pacific Sugar Conference
    Fiji, 29-31 October 1997
    1998
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    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FOREWORD -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This publication contains the proceedings of the International Sugar Conference held in Fiji from 29 to 31 October 1997. The Conference was jointly organised by the Government of Fiji and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The Conference addressed "Policy issues for Asia a nd the Pacific in the Next Round of Mulitlateral Negotiations." The theoretical outlook, framework and analysis, and background documentation to these issues were prepared by the Sugar and Beverage Group of the Raw Materials, Tropical and Horticultural Products Service, Commodities and Trade Division, FAO. These were published as Conference papers, covering a range of issues and included country studies for the major regional producers and consumers; the quantitative outlook to 2005; the impact of trade liberalisation on the world sugar market; and a discussion on the nurtitional aspects of sugar. Papers were also prepared and presented by internationally renowned speakers from the world sugar trade (Tote and Lyle - Australia; Sparks - United States; Siel Limited - India); grower and miller organizations (the Philippine Sugar Millers Association; the Thai Roong Ruang Group and the Australian Sugar Milling Council); government institutions (USDA and the Queensland Sugar Corporatio n) and other international organizations (World Bank and International Sugar Organization). The keynote addresses were given by the Honourable Mr Militoni Leweniqila, the Fiji Minister for Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries and ALTA, and Mr J.N. Greenfield, the Director of the Commodities and Trade Division, who also summed up the proceedings.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    No. 14 Towards appropriate agricultural trade policy for low income developing countries
    No. 14 CONSIDERATIONS IN THE REFORM OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE POLICY in low income developing countries
    2006
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    Many developing countries are currently under pressure to reduce their trade barriers to the entry of agricultural products. This pressure comes both as a result of ongoing trade negotiations (multilateral, plurilateral or bilateral) and due to policy advice from donors and international organizations based on the assumption that a liberal agricultural trade policy is necessary to allow growth through trade expansion. Although developing countries are very heterogeneous both in terms of their economic standing and in terms of what is asked of them in trade negotiations, these sources of pressure have tended to become conflated into a common consensus that further agricultural trade liberalization is appropriate for all countries, regardless of their level of development or of their trading partners trade policy stance.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    TRADE REFORMS AND FOOD SECURITY
    CONCEPTUALIZING THE LINKAGES
    2003
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    Although given prominence in the context of the current World Trade Organization (WTO) trade negotiations, trade reforms are generally a component of a wider set of economic and institutional reforms. The complexity of reform packages, the wide variation in policy sets, the context within which they are used, and the thoroughness with which they are followed through, makes it extremely difficult to isolate the impact of specific trade reforms on the food security status of developing countries. As yet, there is no clear consensus on answers to general questions, such as “will developing countries benefit from reduced agricultural protection in economies of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)?”, let alone more specific questions which might include “how can developing country governments best promote smallholder agriculture in the new global environment, and what form of special and differential treatment might be required to allow them to do so?” In many c ases, “successful” reforms have been achieved not in isolation, but as a consequence of associated policy implementation. In drawing lessons from reforms that are perceived to have benefited food insecure groups, or at the very least, not to have disadvantaged them, it is therefore important to identify the complementary policies that facilitated the process of adjustment to more productive activities, and any compensatory policies that acted to alleviate the transitional losses that insecure gr oups may otherwise have faced. A clearer understanding of the often-obscured effects of trade reform on food security is therefore vital if the drivers of further reform are to result in changes to the benefit of insecure and vulnerable groups in poor countries.

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