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Gender equality and forestry in West Africa

Preliminary findings and recommendations for West Africa countries










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    Analysing the agrifood sector in Lebanon through the perspective of gender-sensitive value chains
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    This study identifies value chain (VC) opportunities for women cooperatives, associations and individuals by adopting the FAO Gender-Sensitive Value Chain (GSVC) framework of analysis. In addition to the core and extended VC levels, as well as the national and global enabling environment. This framework adds two dimensions to be analyzed which are the individual and household levels, the areas in which gender inequalities frequently start from. Therefore, adding these two levels of analysis facilitates the systematic integration of gender equality into VC development programmes and projects. In addition to experts for each sub-sector, namely plant production, forestry, fisheries and aquaculture, animal production and agro-processing, this study included a gender consultant who played a major role in the different phases of the study. These included preparing and giving workshops to the sub-sector experts prior to the literature review and analysis, aligning their work within a gender framework, in addition to participating in the data collection phase, where the consultant revised the data collection tools prepared by the sub-sector experts for the Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), Survey and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and attended the majority of the KIIs. The consultant additionally revised the analysis of each sub-sector, included a gender assessment and assisted in the study’s reporting.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Gender, water and agriculture
    Assessing the nexus in Palestine
    2023
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    Gender inequality in Palestine has contributed to the marginalization of women from access and control over available resources including water. This inequality has been entrenched through legal, political and social systems. Palestine’s Gender-Responsive Water Assessment was carried out in the West Bank in 2021 by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in partnership with the Palestinian Authority (PA)- Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) as part of the “Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Water Efficiency, Productivity and Water Sustainability in NENA [North East and North Africa] Countries (GCP/RNE/009/SWE)” project. The project had recommended gender-responsive water assessments to evaluate the relative situation of women and men in different communities regarding water access, governance and use in the countries targeted by the interventions. The aim of the assessment was to outline areas where future investments and programme interventions in water and agriculture would be needed to support progress towards gender equality and sustainable water resource management in a synergistic way. In addition to a review of the existing literature, the study gathered information at the field level, assessing five local communities in the northern West Bank.
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    Document
    Women in the Banana Export Industry. Regional Report on West & Central Africa.
    Working paper. Series for the World Banana Forum.
    2015
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    ‘Women in the Banana Export Industry Regional Report on West & Central Africa’ is part of a global report on the economic aspects of gender issues in the banana sector. It analyses key issues for women workers with a particular focus on women’s employment in the region. The main roles carried out by women in the workplace are identified as are any advances towards Decent Work that have been made through multi stakeholder and project activity in West and Central Africa. The report will inform the gender work of the World Banana Forum. Women’s employment in the region varies from 11% in Côte d'Ivoire, to 21% in Cameroon. This is in part explained by the dominant operator in Ghana and Cameroon, Compagnie Fruitiere, being more restrictive of women’s employment in the field. The key issues for women across all three countries in the study (Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, and Cameroon) were low wages, hours of work, health and safety (in particular for pregnant women and nursing mothers, sexual harass ment and lack of childcare provision. Women experience a triple burden as plantation worker, domestic worker and child carer. In Cameroon and Ghana women reported earning less than men. Lack of education and training is a key barrier to better employment opportunities for women which companies are beginning to address. The Collective Bargaining Agreement between GAWU and Golden Exotics Ltd was an example of best practice, aiming to create a ’women friendly’ environment. Unions involved in the re port are active in gender training initiatives for women workers and representatives in partnership with British NGO, Banana Link, and the IUF. The African case shows that gender does not need to prevent women being employed in banana operations in both the field and packhouse, increasing job opportunities for women, although further research is needed to assess the impacts of greater numbers of women being employed in the field.

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