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Sociological study: Assessment of digital skills of small farmers, with and without labour migration experience, to market online their agricultural products

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    Book (stand-alone)
    Skills Development for Inclusive Growth in the Lebanese Agriculture Sector - Policy Brief 2020
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    This policy brief presents a summary study of the situation of agriculture and food sector, specifically the agricultural labour market in Lebanon, and highlights the importance of addressing a pronounced skills mismatch in the agricultural labour market to spur agriculture sector development. It reflects the difficulties employers are facing in finding workers with the skills required to perform their jobs at a price that they are able to pay; noting that skill mismatches were reported in all sub-sectors, including several technical and life such as a number of crop and animal farming skills as well as some craft-related skills. In addition, the agricultural technical schools training does not meet market demand and these schools On-Job-Training (OJT) are insufficient to fill the needed gaps in labour market. One more major challenge increasing the skill mismatch is the lack of interest of youth in enrolling in agricultural technical schools. Thus this policy highlights the importance of work-based learning, innovative practices for small-scale farmers, introduction of new techniques and skills, and the necessity of upgrading the agricultural technical schools to meet market demands and to encourage the engagement of students in the agricultural sector. Of course, this is a whole process the policy includes with the recommended role of the Ministry of Agriculture and its education and services department highlighted in the ministry’s 2021-2025 strategy, development of competency-based approach to teaching, learning, testing and certification for improved quality within the agricultural TVET system, in addition to the development of apprenticeship framework.
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    Book (series)
    Collaborating to develop agricultural skills
    Capacity-building agencies in the United States of America
    2021
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    Investing in farmers – or agriculture human capital – is crucial to addressing challenges in our agri-food systems. A global study carried out by the FAO Investment Centre and the International Food Policy Research Institute, with support from the CGIAR Research Programme on Policies, Institutions and Markets and the FAO Research and Extension Unit, looks at agriculture human capital investments, from trends to promising initiatives. One of the nine featured case studies comes from the State of Mississippi in the United States of America. Agencies from i) formal education systems; (ii) nonformal education systems; (iii) state governmental agencies; and (iv) advocacy and commodity groups collaborated to develop agriculture human capital among youth and adults. Agency documents, representatives and clients described technical skills and functional skills developed, resulting in benefits like increased agricultural productivity, reduced expenses, higher individual or farm income, networks linking farmers and other producers, a better prepared workforce and a strong agriculture industry with good economic returns. This publication is part of the Country Investment Highlights series under the FAO Investment Centre's Knowledge for Investment (K4I) programme.
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    Migrant workers and remittances in the context of COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa 2020
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    African migrants stimulate economic growth and development in areas of destination, transit and origin through their labour, skills transfer, consumption and investments. Their remittances also make significant contributions to food security, human capital, rural development and overall Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in areas of origin. The impact of COVID-19 affects migrant workers disproportionally. Often precarious working conditions and overcrowded living and transport arrangements increase their vulnerability to contagion and loss of employment, threatening their health and livelihoods. Those working under informal arrangements, commonly in the agriculture sector, are largely excluded from accessing real-time reliable information, social protection, healthcare and government response measures. Urban-to-rural return migration increases due to lockdowns and job losses in cities. This context poses challenges and opportunities in rural sectors, while many return migrants face stigmatization as potential carriers of the virus. A 23 percent decline in remittances flow into sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), as a result of economic downturns, restrictions in movement and challenges sending transfers to SSA, is expected to heavily impact the livelihoods of households and countries that rely on them for food and other basic expenditures, such as health and education.

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