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International Year of Forests 2011 – Celebrate forests every day







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    Année internationale des forêts 2011 – Célébrez les forêts tous les jours 2011
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    L’année 2011 est une année particulière pour les forêts et pour tous ceux qui s’y intéressent. En vue de l’inaugurer, la FAO a conçu ce numéro spécial d’Unasylva. Plus de 100 journées internationales sont célébrées au cours de l’année, en reconnaissance d’un vaste éventail de thèmes, occupations, activités et valeurs culturelles importants pour l’humanité. Quelle meilleure façon avons-nous de montrer la myriade de fonctions remplies par les forêts que de mettre en évidence leurs liens avec la plupart de celles-ci? L’éditeur d’Unasylva, Andrea Perlis, a assemblé une série d’images pour illustrer ces liens. À l’aide seulement de photos et de quelques très brèves histoires, le numéro développe le thème de l’année internationale – «Les forêts au service des populations» – en montrant le rôle important qu’elles jouent dans presque toutes les activités humaines. Ainsi, lorsqu’en 2011 vous célébrez la Journée mondiale de la paix, ou la Journée internationale de la femme, o u la Journée des droits de l’homme, ou encore la Journée mondiale de la santé – voire la Journée de l’aviation civile internationale –, vous pouvez célébrer les forêts.
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    The forest sector in the green economy in Africa
    Nature & Faune Vol. 26, Issue 1
    2011
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    With its special focus on “The forest sector in the green economy in Africa”, this issue shows many ways in which the forestry and natural resource sectors can contribute to the needs of the green economy in Africa. A green economy is defined as one that results in improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. The Global Citizens Center, led by Kevin Danaher, defines green economy as a global aggregate of individual comm unities meeting the needs of its citizens through the responsible, local production and exchange of goods and services. The present edition highlights the significance of the forestry sector to the overall economy and its importance in general in the region’s land use, demonstrating its potential to make a difference in improving (or worsening) an economy’s green credentials. It is an important message about forestry and greenness. You will discover how forestry helps greenness and w hat challenges it faces in doing this with regard to energy, water, carbon management, biodiversity management and conservation. The articles envisage how forestry will continue to deliver its economic, environmental and social functions in Africa while interacting with other sectors in making the collectivity of sectors to build up a “green” overall economy. Authors contributed articles that show different approaches and actions in integrating sustainability in economic sectors. This edi tion of Nature & Faune marks the end of the International Year of the Forests 2011; however, it emphasizes the need to continue to work together to achieve the transition to a green economy that is a major pathway to promoting sustainable cycles of production and consumption while ensuring the health and integrity of Africa’s ecosystems, and our continued survival and well-being.
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    Booklet
    Celebrating 40 years in Indonesia
    Celebrating a 70-year partnership and 40-years of in-country Representation
    2018
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    After seven decades of fruitful collaboration, the work of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today is more than ever aligned with the priorities of host governments in meeting the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 through localized action. As a specialized agency in food and agriculture, and with its feet firmly on the ground, FAO implements programmes and projects in cooperation with its members and partners to achieve the shared goal of #ZeroHunger and all of the other SDGs by 2030. While FAO had previously provided technical support to member countries without having a permanent presence on the ground, the 1977 opening of the first country Representation in Lebanon marked the beginning of FAO’s long-term field presence at national level. In Indonesia, the Minister of Foreign Affairs on behalf of the Government of Indonesia, signed the Memorandum of Understanding on the establishment of the FAO Representation in Indonesia just one year later with the Director General of FAO in October 1978. Hence, our celebration today, marking the 40th year, after which FAO established a permanent presence in Indonesia. Close collaboration between FAO and the Indonesian Government across the food and agricultural sectors, including in fisheries and forestry, has strengthened over the decades, and has resulted in a long term trust and friendship between FAO and many government departments and agencies, as well as non-governmental actors in development. As of today, over 650 projects and programs have been implemented by FAO throughout Indonesia with the assistance of more than 1600 experts and consultants (both national and international). Given still significant levels of rural poverty, malnutrition and rapid urbanization, Indonesia’s challenge is to make agriculture, fisheries and forestry more profitable, while also making these sectors more resilient to the effects of climate change to feed future generations. It is FAO’s ambition to work with key line Ministries to demonstrate good practice through targeted interventions, which can then be scaled up with Government’s own human and financial resources, while also contributing at the policy level to help redirect investment to where it will have a more positive impact on achieving greater food and nutrition security.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Année internationale des forêts 2011 – Célébrez les forêts tous les jours 2011
    Also available in:

    L’année 2011 est une année particulière pour les forêts et pour tous ceux qui s’y intéressent. En vue de l’inaugurer, la FAO a conçu ce numéro spécial d’Unasylva. Plus de 100 journées internationales sont célébrées au cours de l’année, en reconnaissance d’un vaste éventail de thèmes, occupations, activités et valeurs culturelles importants pour l’humanité. Quelle meilleure façon avons-nous de montrer la myriade de fonctions remplies par les forêts que de mettre en évidence leurs liens avec la plupart de celles-ci? L’éditeur d’Unasylva, Andrea Perlis, a assemblé une série d’images pour illustrer ces liens. À l’aide seulement de photos et de quelques très brèves histoires, le numéro développe le thème de l’année internationale – «Les forêts au service des populations» – en montrant le rôle important qu’elles jouent dans presque toutes les activités humaines. Ainsi, lorsqu’en 2011 vous célébrez la Journée mondiale de la paix, ou la Journée internationale de la femme, o u la Journée des droits de l’homme, ou encore la Journée mondiale de la santé – voire la Journée de l’aviation civile internationale –, vous pouvez célébrer les forêts.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    The forest sector in the green economy in Africa
    Nature & Faune Vol. 26, Issue 1
    2011
    Also available in:

    With its special focus on “The forest sector in the green economy in Africa”, this issue shows many ways in which the forestry and natural resource sectors can contribute to the needs of the green economy in Africa. A green economy is defined as one that results in improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. The Global Citizens Center, led by Kevin Danaher, defines green economy as a global aggregate of individual comm unities meeting the needs of its citizens through the responsible, local production and exchange of goods and services. The present edition highlights the significance of the forestry sector to the overall economy and its importance in general in the region’s land use, demonstrating its potential to make a difference in improving (or worsening) an economy’s green credentials. It is an important message about forestry and greenness. You will discover how forestry helps greenness and w hat challenges it faces in doing this with regard to energy, water, carbon management, biodiversity management and conservation. The articles envisage how forestry will continue to deliver its economic, environmental and social functions in Africa while interacting with other sectors in making the collectivity of sectors to build up a “green” overall economy. Authors contributed articles that show different approaches and actions in integrating sustainability in economic sectors. This edi tion of Nature & Faune marks the end of the International Year of the Forests 2011; however, it emphasizes the need to continue to work together to achieve the transition to a green economy that is a major pathway to promoting sustainable cycles of production and consumption while ensuring the health and integrity of Africa’s ecosystems, and our continued survival and well-being.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Celebrating 40 years in Indonesia
    Celebrating a 70-year partnership and 40-years of in-country Representation
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    After seven decades of fruitful collaboration, the work of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today is more than ever aligned with the priorities of host governments in meeting the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 through localized action. As a specialized agency in food and agriculture, and with its feet firmly on the ground, FAO implements programmes and projects in cooperation with its members and partners to achieve the shared goal of #ZeroHunger and all of the other SDGs by 2030. While FAO had previously provided technical support to member countries without having a permanent presence on the ground, the 1977 opening of the first country Representation in Lebanon marked the beginning of FAO’s long-term field presence at national level. In Indonesia, the Minister of Foreign Affairs on behalf of the Government of Indonesia, signed the Memorandum of Understanding on the establishment of the FAO Representation in Indonesia just one year later with the Director General of FAO in October 1978. Hence, our celebration today, marking the 40th year, after which FAO established a permanent presence in Indonesia. Close collaboration between FAO and the Indonesian Government across the food and agricultural sectors, including in fisheries and forestry, has strengthened over the decades, and has resulted in a long term trust and friendship between FAO and many government departments and agencies, as well as non-governmental actors in development. As of today, over 650 projects and programs have been implemented by FAO throughout Indonesia with the assistance of more than 1600 experts and consultants (both national and international). Given still significant levels of rural poverty, malnutrition and rapid urbanization, Indonesia’s challenge is to make agriculture, fisheries and forestry more profitable, while also making these sectors more resilient to the effects of climate change to feed future generations. It is FAO’s ambition to work with key line Ministries to demonstrate good practice through targeted interventions, which can then be scaled up with Government’s own human and financial resources, while also contributing at the policy level to help redirect investment to where it will have a more positive impact on achieving greater food and nutrition security.

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