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Securing sustainable small-scale fisheries: sharing good practices from around the world

FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper No. 644














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    Report of the Latin America and Caribbean Regional Consultative Meeting on Securing sustainable small-scale fisheries: bringing together responsible fisheries and social development, San José, Costa Rica, 20-22 October 2010 / Informe de la reunión consultiva regional de América Latina y el Caribe sobre Proteger la pesca sostenible en pequeña escala: unificación de la pesca responsable y el desarrollo social, San José, Costa Rica, del 20 al 22 de octubre de 2010 2011
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    The Latin America and Caribbean Regional Consultative Meeting was one of three regional consultative workshops carried out as a follow-up to the 2009 inception workshop of the FAO Extrabudgetary Programme on Fisheries and Aquaculture for Poverty Alleviation and Food Security. The workshops built on the outcomes of the Global Conference on Small-scale Fisheries held in Bangkok in October 2008 and referred to the recommendations made by the 26th Session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in March 2009 with regard to the potential development of an international instrument and programme for Small-scale fisheries. The purpose of the workshops was to provide guidance on the scope and contents of such an international small-scale fisheries instrument and on the possible priorities and implementation modalities for a global assistance programme. It was organized around plenary presentations on key subjects and working group discussions. The workshop agreed that an international instrum ent on small-scale fisheries and a related programme would be important tools for securing sustainable small-scale fisheries. It recommended that a small-scale fisheries international instrument and assistance programme should be informed by human rights principles and existing instruments relevant to good governance and sustainable development, comprise the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) as a guiding principle for resource management and development, and incorporate Disaster Risk Managem ent (DRM) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) as an integral part considering that DRM is a continuum process, before, during and after a disaster. The instrument should draw upon the available experiences with good governance practices in small-scale fisheries at national, regional and global levels and strengthen mechanisms for information sharing and communication, including by regional and subregional organizations and by associations and networks of fishworkers organizations, both of men an d women, and civil society organizations (CSO). The instrument should draw on the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, as well as the international voluntary guidelines that are being developed under the auspices of FAO on land tenure and natural resources. It was recognized that there was a continuing need to promote the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in small-scale fisheries.
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    Transition towards an ecosystem approach to fisheries in the Mediterranean Sea
    Lessons learned through selected case studies
    2022
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    FAO has promoted the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) as an appropriate framework for the sustainable development and management of fisheries worldwide. With a view to contribute to the identification of lessons and good practices for EAF implementation, this publication documents nine case studies that attempted to put into practice some of the key principles and tools of the approach in the Mediterranean Sea. The case studies were selected to cover a broad range of contexts including smallscale and industrial fisheries operating at local, national and sub-regional scales. It was not within the scope of the publication to evaluate the level of implementation of the ecosystem approach. A specific tool for monitoring implementation is proposed and exemplified. Case studies were analysed with a view to draw preliminary lessons regarding the enabling factors that facilitated the progress made as well as the challenges faced in the transition towards EAF-based management systems. Attention is drawn to key enabling conditions such as favourable policies, legislation and regulatory frameworks, the existence of regional mechanisms for cooperation, favourable market dynamics and social processes, and the relatively low complexity of the fishery systems analysed. A set of factors emerged that contributed to progress during implementation, such as the clear definition of fishing rights, the enhancement of mechanisms for compliance, scientific monitoring and adaptation of management measures, as well as the explicit consideration of biological and socioeconomic aspects in management actions. Further progress in the transition towards sustainable management systems is hampered by external and internal factors. External factors are related, for instance, to environmental changes, the poor regulation and control of competing sectors, consumer behaviour and the governance environment. Issues such as stakeholder representation, knowledge gaps and the availability of sustainable sources of funding are among common internal factors. The authors also discuss how slow progress in the implementation of management plans can generate discredit with the institutions and add additional challenges for any future initiatives to engage stakeholders in participatory management. The case-based results and lessons of how the ecosystem approach to fisheries was considered, developed and implemented in the fisheries discussed in this publication not only contribute to the documentation of current practices in the Mediterranean but may also guide future attempts to further develop the field.
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    Global Conference on Tenure and User Rights in Fisheries 2018: Achieving Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, Yeosu, Republic of Korea, 10–14 September 2018 2019
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    Marine and inland fisheries provide millions of people around the globe with food security and livelihood opportunities. Advancing knowledge on how the world’s marine and inland capture fisheries are accessed, used, and managed using various types of rights-based approaches (RBAs) is a crucial step towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and attaining food and nutrition security and livelihood benefits. The Global Conference on Tenure and User Rights in Fisheries 2018 created a neutral platform for a wide variety of participants, including government officials; fishers from industrial, small-scale and indigenous/traditional communities; fisheries-related stakeholders; nongovernment organizations (NGOs); civil society organizations (CSOs); intergovernmental organizations (IGOs); and academics from around the world. Sharing perceptions and experiences, participants exchanged information and concrete examples through case studies on how tenure and RBAs can harmonize the concepts of responsible fisheries, social and economic development as well as ideas and concerns about the fair and equitable application of user rights in capture fisheries. UserRights 2018 was a unique event that brought together both technical expertise and practical case studies, with the objective of using this diverse knowledge to advance the SDGs.

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