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Data snapshot using sex-disaggregated data to better understand gender gaps in agriculture










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    Project
    Support to Use Sex Disaggregated Data in Agriculture to Make Second Generation National Agriculture Investment Plans (NAIPS) and Regional Agriculture Investment Plans (RAIPS) Gender Responsive - TCP/RAF/3803 2024
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    The lack of sex-disaggregated data in the agricultural sector is a great hindrance to understanding and addressing gender disparities in rural African communities. Existing plans and strategies inadequately capture the complexity of women's lives, impacting their ability to benefit from investment and growth opportunities. Better data is needed to (1) account for all of women’s work, (2) help improve women’s productivity and food security and nutrition, and (3) better understand and more effectively tackle poverty. Disaggregated data can support policymakers in developing gender-sensitive plans, however a joint review by the African Union Commission (AUC) and FAO found that Regional and National Agricultural Investment Plans (RAIPs and NAIPs) do not sufficiently take gender issues into account. NAIPs are key to deciding how policies and strategies will look in terms of national investments in agriculture and are critical to food production, the generation of national wealth from agriculture, managing risks, building assets, and reducing poverty.
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    Booklet
    Guidance note on gender-sensitive vulnerability assessments in agriculture 2018
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    This guidance note was developed to support development and humanitarian practitioners in carrying out a gender-sensitive vulnerability assessment, in order to identify and address the main sources of vulnerability of men and women in the agriculture sector. The note describes what are the main constraints that male and female farmers face in the agriculture sector, with a focus on climate change. It also provides an overview of available sources and methodologies to collect and analyze sex-disaggregated data. The specific aspects of climate change and targeted outcomes for men and women can vary widely across diverse areas, so this note discusses data sources and empirical approaches that can be applied across different contexts.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    How can women control water? 2016
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    Women and men with better access to water have lower levels of undernourishment, especially where they depend on local agriculture for food and income for an active and healthy life. Despite their essential contributions to rural economy at subsistence and commercial levels, women face severe constraints to raise production and productivity, due to limited access to water resources, agricultural services, markets, employment, decision-making in management systems and resources allocation for dom estic and productive purposes. Rural women and girls spend daily 152 million hours collecting water for domestic use. Their multiple tasks limit their participation in food security and agricultural activities, local governance structures and training. Possible actions to incorporate gender perspectives in the global water agenda are: introduce innovative technologies, create an enabling environment towards gender equality, support their legal empowerment, strengthen governance structures, colle ct sex-disaggregated data, invest in infrastructure development, and networking, advocating for women’s involvement at all levels.

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