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Fishing boat designs: 2. V-bottom boats of planked and plywood construction (Rev.2)












​Gulbrandsen, Ø.. Fishing boat designs: 2. V-bottom boats of planked and plywood construction. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 134, Rev. 2. Rome, FAO. 2004. 64p. 




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    The increasing cost and scarcity of durable boatbuilding timbers have affected the construction of fishing craft around the world. The developed world has by and large witnessed the transfer from traditional wooden boatbuilding methods to either less conventional wood construction techniques (e.g., plywood or wood laminates) or non-wood materials such as fibre reinforced plastic (FRP), steel, aluminium and ferrocement. These techniques generally favour less labour intensive methods of constructi on. In the developing world where timber is still the predominant boatbuilding material, the scarcity and high cost of good quality timber have not meant that less wooden boats are being built, but rather that building quality has deteriorated through the use of poor quality timber. At the same time, however, attempts have been made to diversify construction methods with varying degrees of success. This publication is intended to benefit those who are considering ferrocement construction; it is assumed that those who use the book are already conversant in small fishing vessel construction.
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    Safety at Sea - Safety Guide for Small Fishing Boats- BOBP/REP/112 2009
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    Fishing is a very dangerous occupation with a high accident risk. Experience has shown that it is often when a fishery develops from traditional sail-powered craft and near shore fishing to motorized craft venturing further out to sea and with new fishing methods that accidents happen. In many developing countries, fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP) boats are replacing traditional wooden boats and this new construction material requires new thinking when it comes to strength, stability and the ability to keep afloat when swamped. It is often difficult to do something about boats already in operation, but significant safety measures can be incorporated at relatively low cost in boats yet to be built. Close cooperation between the government departments responsible for safety legislation and the boatyards is required. The purpose of this safety guide is to present simple measures to ensure that new boats will satisfy internationally accepted safety standards. The target group c onsists of boat designers, boatbuilders, boat owners, skippers and government officials responsible for drafting new regulations and for safety supervision. This safety guide is not intended to be comprehensive and deal with all kinds of safety issues, but it will highlight the main problems and indicate what practical measures can be taken to avoid them. The guide mainly deals with small boats of less than 15min length, which, from experience are most prone to accidents. The Food and Agricu lture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) are working together to draft new safety recommendations for decked fishing boats of less than 12 m and undecked fishing boats of any length. This work is expected to be finalized by 2010. The present guide is a revision of BOBP/MAG/16: A safety guide for small offshore fishing vessels issued by the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) in 1993. The main chang e is that this publication not only focuses on small offshore fishing boats in the 10-13 m range, but also includes smaller coastal boats. The revision has benefited from recent work regarding the safety of small craft as given below. FAO/SIDA/IMO/BOBP-IGO
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    This paper summaries a study on the availability and prices of materials used to construct the hulls of fishing craft for the important small-scale fisheries of the East Coast of India. The paper should be of interest to development planners, legislators and administrators. Builders of fishing craft, suppliers of materials, and owners and prospective owners of fishing craft may also find useful the information on trends in prices and availability of boatbuilding materials and the possibilities o f alternative materials. The study covered the following boatbuilding materials: timber for kattumarams and boats; fibre-reinforced plastics; ferrocement; steel; and aluminium, which is used forsheathing wooden hulls and is also a construction material in its own right. The study was carried out by Matsyasagar Consultancy Services Private Limited under contract to the Programme for the Development of Small-Scale Fisheries in the Bay of Bengal, GCP/RAS/040/SWE (usually abbreviated to th e Bay of Bengal Programme). The Programme is executed by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) and funded by the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA). The main aims of the Bay of Bengal Programme are to develop and demonstrate technologies by which the conditions of small-scale fishermen and the supply of fish from the small-scale sector may be improved, in five of the countries bordering the Bay of Bengal — Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka an d Thailand.

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