Thumbnail Image

Analysis and Mapping of Impacts under Climate Change for Adaptation and Food Security (AMICAF) project in Paraguay

Policy recommendations for addressing climate change and food security vulnerability









FAO. 2019. Analysis and Mapping of Impacts under Climate Change for Adaptation and Food Security (AMICAF) project in Paraguay. Rome.


Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Fisheries and aquaculture in Tajikistan: review and policy framework 2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The fishery sector currently plays a minor role in development of the rural economy of Tajikistan. Its contribution to the country’s Gross National Product was in recent years less than 0.1 percent. Despite the availability of extensive water resources (ponds, reservoirs, lakes, rivers and channels), fish production has fallen from 4 000 tonnes in 1991 to 214 tonnes in 2006. As a consequence, fish consumption per capita has decreased to a level less than 0.5kg, compared to 3kg at the end of the 1980s. Fishery in Tajikistan started with the construction of Farkhadskiy and Kayrakkum reservoirs in the north of the Republic. Aquaculture development received the most attention. In the early 1960s the government carried out a large-scale program of fish farming development. Under this programme aquaculture farms with a total area of about 2 500 hectares (ha) were established. Production technologies included semi-intensive culture and extensive polyculture of carp in earthen ponds. Specie s cultured were common carp Cyprinus carpio carpio, silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, bighead carp H. nobilis, and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. Aquaculture provided 70-80 percent of the marketed fish before independence. After independence the reform process of the economy led to a partly privatized fishery sector. The poorly managed privatization process negatively affected the fishery and aquaculture sector. Combined with a general economic crisis, breaking of communications an d dramatic decrease in trade with the former Soviet Union states, limited availability of commercial fish feeds and hatchery equipment, limited investment in research, training and education, the privatization process can be considered disastrous for the sector. At present the sector is slowly recovering but the severe winter in 2007/2008 (the coldest in over 25 years) set back the sector’s growth. The principal fishery sector governing body is the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA). Scientific rese arch is mainly carried out by the Department of Ichthyology and Hydrobiology of the Institute of Zoology and Parasitology under the Academy of Science, of Tajikistan and the Faculty of Ichthyology and Physiology of farm livestock of the Tajik Agrarian University. The MoA, recognizing the potential contribution of the capture fisheries and aquaculture sectors to rural poverty alleviation, achievement of food security and generation of alternative employment, has started to support actively the rehabilitation of the sector. Acknowledging that the country cannot develop the sector on its own, the MoA took a leading role in the initiation of regional collaboration, by organizing the first Regional Intergovernmental meeting to initiate the establishment of a Central Asian Fisheries Organization in November 2008. This FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular has three main aims. First, it is intended to inform those interested in fisheries and aquaculture in Tajikistan about the current situation with regard to fishery resources and their utilization in the country. Second, it attempts to provide background information in support of the national sectoral policy and strategy formulation process. Thirdly, it may serve as guidance for future interventions by the government and donors in support of the sustainable development and management of the sector.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Climate-Smart Agriculture in Guinea-Bissau 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The climate smart agriculture (CSA) concept reflects an ambition to improve the integration of agriculture development and climate responsiveness. It aims to achieve food security and broader development goals under a changing climate and increasing food demand. CSA initiatives sustainably increase productivity, enhance resilience, and reduce/remove greenhouse gases (GHGs), and require planning to address trade-offs and synergies between three pillars: productivity, adaptation and mitigation. The priorities of different countries and stakeholders are reflected to achieve more efficient, effective, and equitable food systems that address challenges in environment, social, and economic dimensions across productive landscapes. The country profile provides a snapshot of a developing baseline created to initiate discussion, both within countries and globally, about entry points for investing in CSA at scale. The agricultural sector is the main stay of the economy of Guinea-Bissau. In the absence of other resources, the sector despite being underdeveloped plays a leading role in supporting food security and job creation. Presently it contributes about 46% of national gross domestic product (GDP) with 84% of the population actively employed in primary production agriculture largely dominated by women. The majority of these farmer are small scale farmers farming on less than two hectare (2 ha). More than half (58%) of the total land in Guinea-Bissau is used for agriculture with area under forest heavily degraded by rapid exploitation. However, there are huge potentials for agricultural and forestry land including arable land estimated at about 1.5 million hectares. Farmers engage in the production of diverse crops and livestock such as cashew, rice (country’s staple food), sorghum, maize, etc largely cultivated by subsistence farmers. Women usually take up horticulture in the urban areas. Livestock production concentrated mainly in the north and east of the country is one of the main economic activities supporting food security and thousands of livelihoods. The country is divided into three agroecological zones based on ecological, climatic and demographic characteristics. Agriculture is mainly rainfed with very limited irrigated farming practised. About 82% of water withdrawn is used for agricultural purposes impelling a necessity for huge investments in irrigation to support agriculture production. The projected population growth and food demand is expected to have serious implications on food security with a potential to affect the agricultural sector. Despite the agro-forestry-pastoral potential and fisheries resources of Guinea-Bissau, many studies have shown that, the current food situation in the country is very precarious with poverty identified as the underlining cause. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission from the agricultural sector has been identified as very high with the country indicating reforestation as the major action for mitigating GHG emissions in its nationally determined contribution (NDC). Some challenges for the agricultural sector identified include (i) growth in population and food demand, (ii) land use change and natural resource depletion, (iii) limited marketing opportunities of agricultural commodities, and (iv) climate change and variability. Guinea-Bissau has a typical hot, humid monsoon-like tropical climate with two well-defined seasons. Agriculture is exposed to the effects of climate change with the country vulnerable to droughts, floods and sea level rise. The projected changes in temperature and rainfall are expected to have substantial impact on water resources which are already limited in their capacity to provide sufficient water for the agriculture sector. CSA technologies and practises present opportunities for addressing climate change challenges as well as for economic growth and development of the agriculture sector. Identified CSA practises in use in the country include (i) use of organic manure, (ii) use of weather information, (iii) water supply through drip irrigation, (iv) anti-erosion arrangement, (v) forage/fodder production, (vi) crop rotation, and (vii) rainwater harvesting through the Zai technique. There are a number of institutions and policies aimed at supporting and increasing agriculture productivity and advancing CSA practises in Guinea-Bissau. These include government, private sector, the national institute for agrarian research and general directorate of rural engineering with each most of the institutions profiles having CSA-related activities that deliver on all three pillars of CSA. The Ministry of environment which serves as the country’s UNFCCC focal point and Nationally Designated Authority to the Green Climate Fund (GCF), Adaptation fund, Climate Investment Fund and Global Environment Facility is responsible for the country’s climate change plans and policies. The food and agriculture organisation of the United Nations, the United Nations development programme and the international union for conservation of nature play instrumental roles in the promotion of sustainable agriculture and environmental sustainability. Most of the climate change and CSA-related funding have come from international sources with the UNDP being of great support through its signature programmes.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Philippines and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Philippines is one of the 34 charter member nations that founded FAO in Quebec City, Canada on 16 October 1945. The first FAO operations in the Philippines started in 1959 under the auspices of the United Nations Special Fund and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). FAO activities in the Philippines gradually increased over the years, and complemented government’s efforts through technical and development interventions in the fields of agriculture, fisheries, forestry and rural d evelopment. The Philippines has always taken a keen interest in the work of FAO because of its mandate and the country’s strong traditions in agriculture, forestry, fisheries, nutrition and rural development. In view of FAO’s expanding programme in the country, and in order to better serve its target clientele, an FAO Representative Office was established in the Philippines on 1 January 1978. In more than three decades of cooperation between the Philippine government and FAO, a multitude of FAO supported projects have been implemented in the country in close partnerships with the Departments (Ministries) of Agriculture (DA), Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Agrarian Reform (DAR), and Science and Technology (DOST) in addition to a number of state universities and colleges. Coordinating the preparation and implementation of various projects is done through the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), or the central planning agency, to minimize duplication and overlapp ing activities with other multilateral and bilateral donor agencies. Among the past FAO-assisted projects in the Philippines are those on Coconut Research and Development, Multiple-Use Forestry, Aquaculture Development and Training, Soils and Land Resources Appraisal and Training, Agro-Forestry, Forestry Education, Small Farmers Development, Carabao (WaterBuffalo) Research and Development, Agrarian Reform and Rural Development, Integrated Pest Management, Food Security and Nutrition, Control of Animal Diseases, Master Plan for Forestry Development and many others. To date, FAO has implemented a total of 393 national projects, of which 130 were funded by TCP, 99 by UNDP, 114 by Trust Fund, 18 by TeleFood, 5 by Unilateral Trust Fund (UTF), 4 by Freedom from Hunger Campaign, 20 by UNFPA, and 3 are joint programmes funded by UNDP and JICA. Total FAO assistance for all the national projects amounted to around US$102.4 million. In addition, the Philippines also benefitted from other FAO regi onal and inter-regional projects.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.