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Gender policies for responsible fisheries. Policies to gender equity and livelihoods in small-scale fisheries - SFLP









FAO. 2007. Gender policies for responsible fisheries. Policies to gender equity and livelihoods in small-scale fisheries. New Directions in Fisheries. A Series of Policy Briefs on Development Issues. No. 06. Rome, FAO. 8p.


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    Towards gender-equitable small-scale fisheries. Proceedings of the Expert workshop on gender-equitable small-scale fisheries in the context of the implementation of the SSF Guidelines, Rome, Italy, 28-30 November 2016 2017
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    The Expert Workshop on gender-equitable small-scale fisheries in the context of the implementation of the SSF Guidelines was held on 28-30 November 2016 in FAO Headquarters in Rome, Italy. In keeping with the need expressed by various stakeholders during capacity development on the SSF Guidelines, it was considered important to develop gender guidance to support the application of the SSF Guidelines. It was therefore decided that a Gender Implementation Guide be developed to enhance the underst anding of the gender dimensions of small-scale fisheries and support gender equitable small-scale fisheries. Within this context, the Expert Workshop aimed at presenting and discussing a draft implementation guide (referred to subsequently as Gender Guide or Guide) on how to practically apply the SSF Guidelines in relation to gender issues aimed at supporting: 1. Awareness raising, advocacy and capacity development activities on the application of the relevant principles of the SSF Guidelines , as well as 2. The development and implementation of gender-sensitive sectoral and cross-sectoral policy frameworks and investment plans and programs.
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    Towards gender-equitable small-scale fisheries governance and development - A handbook 2017
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    This manual aims at providing practical guidance on how to achieve gender-equitable small-scale fisheries in the context of the implementation of the SSF Guidelines. Women play a key role, in particular in post-harvest activities relating to processing, marketing and trade, but their role remains undervalued. Within the broader context of the FAO Blue Growth Initiative, this publication therefore contributes to SP 1 Outcome 101 - Member countries and their development partners make explicit poli tical commitments in the form of policies, investment plans, programmes, legal frameworks and the allocation of necessary resources to eradicate hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition. The target audience for this manual is twofold: (i) policy makers/public administrations working on small-scale fisheries will be informed about ways to ensure gender-sensitive policies, investments and small-scale fisheries sector support, (ii) CSOs/Fisheries organizations will receive guidance on how to active ly support the empowerment of women in small-scale fisheries. However, this publication is also relevant for other audiences who can provide a support function to the to key audiences, namely: academia/research, donors/resource partners, FAO staff.
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    A Review of Women's Access to Fish in Small-Scale Fisheries 2015
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    Women play a critical role in every link of the value chain in small-scale fisheries, although their best-known roles are in processing and marketing of fish and other fishery products. This perception of the highly gender-segregated division of labour (men fishing / women processing) has shaped the generalized approach in supporting development initiatives for small-scale fisheries. More often than not, this approach targets men as fishers, and women as processors and marketers of fishery produ cts. However, this generalization has also made fisheries governance blind to women’s other valuable inputs to the sector. In fact, their roles can and should go beyond post-harvest and marketing. However, the lack of utilization of their additional contribution has deterred, for example, women’s participation in fisheries resource management and policy decision-making. The present review aims to move policy attention beyond the generalized, and perhaps limited, perception of women as fish proc essors and marketers and in this way enhance their participation in fisheries resource management and decision-making. The study describes the different ways women have access to fish in small-scale fisheries: as primary users (when they fish by themselves or they finance fishery operations), secondary users (when they access fish through kinship or other close relationships), and tertiary users (when they use capital to buy fish directly from fishers or traders). The review provides case studie s to illustrate some of the issues that tend to keep women in marginalized positions along the value chain. Factors and processes that can contribute to improve women’s participation and decision-making in small-scale fisheries, such as those that challenge conventional approaches based on traditional or “typical” gender roles and obsolete institutional arrangements, are also given. The document also discusses how participation can be improved by raising awareness on gender equality issues along the value chain through applying a gender lens, by providing appropriate support to women’s organizations, including formal recognition of their professional activities, by understanding the socioeconomic context and the particular needs of small-scale fisheries, by giving due attention to power and power relationships, and by taking greater account of the contribution of women in fisheries. As neither women nor men form homogenous groups, the challenge is even greater for women to have access to productive tools and services, which if secured can give them a greater say and control over fisheries resources, thereby increasing their social capital and financial capital. These reflections can be introduced in existing resource management arrangements such as co-management or community-based management, and can probably empower women and improve their participation in fishery resource management decision-making. The reflections in this review can and should be used as guidance and discu ssion material to develop interventions under the Global Assistance Programme in support of the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication.  

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