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Systematic index of international water resources treaties, declarations, acts and cases by basin Vol. I 











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    Book (series)
    Systematic index of international water resources treaties, declarations, acts and cases, by basin  Vol. II 1984
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    In 1978 the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) published a Systematic Index of International Water Resources Treaties, Declarations, Acts and Cases by Basin (Legislative Study No. 15). The Index covered some 2000 international legal instruments the earliest dating from the year 805 and the most recent 1977. It was designed to complement the specialized documentation produced by the United Nations system of organizations in the field of international water resources law. The methodology followed in the preparation of this publication is the same as that followed in the preparation of the 1978 publication. Accordingly, the material compiled has been organized chronologically and tabulated with an indication, for each instrument, of the substance covered and of the water bodies, territories and basins concerned, together with the source of reference and any relevant remarks and annotations. The material compiled covers the period from the year 1648 to-date. In addition, Annexes have been included to provide for the identification of those legal instruments by basin, by country and by region. A detailed explanation of the mode in which this research was carried out and how the tabulated information is to be read is given in the Explanatory Note which follows.
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    Project
    GEF/SLOVENIA: Reducing Water Pollution in the Danube Basin - Project Preparation
    Report N. 3 - April 2003
    2003
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    Within the framework of the International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR) and the GEF Strategic Partnership on the Danube/Black Sea Basin, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), in co-operation with the Global Environment Facility (GEF), is proposing the creation of a new Credit Facility in Slovenia. The primary objective of the Facility will be the reduction of nutrient load in the Danube river basin but it will also finance reductions in other wa ter pollutants, primarily toxic substances. The main focus will be on industries, small and mid-sized municipalities, and large livestock farms to reduce their impact on surface and groundwater. The Facility will build on the work of the Slovenian government to meet the highest European environmental standards, and on the basinwide efforts of ICPDR and other GEF projects. It will contribute to the implementation of these policies by bringing in new investment financing, channelled by local comme rcial banks to the private and municipal sectors, and softened with GEF grant funding. The implementation of the Credit Facility will be facilitated by a Technical Assistance component. Within the GEF International Waters Focal Area, the innovative element of the project is a design that is based on a partnership between financial intermediaries and private enterprises to disburse financial resources aiming at reducing water pollution. The project will focus on Slovenia but aims at creating a re plicable model that could subsequently be implemented in other Danube basin countries. A US$ 9 million GEF grant will be blended with a US$ 45 million EBRD loan to support the Credit Facility which will be on-lent to commercial banks that will in turn channel loans in response to client demand. An additional US$ 0.907 million of GEF funding, supported by US$ 0.842 million of co-financing, will be used to support technical assistance activities.
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    Book (series)
    Water as a Vehicle for Inter-state Cooperation: A Legal Perspective 2003
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    In the first part of this paper the role of the core principles in three different scenarios will be discussed. The first is a setting where a shared watercourse, but no specific treaty exists; the second, where a treaty is in the process of being negotiated; and the third where an agreement over the shared resource is in force. The second par t of the paper will look in detail at the normative content of each principle, its reflection in specific watercourse agreements and its imple mentation by joint bodies. Both parts will show that the contribution of the law is neither simply formal, adding a legal varnish to a negotiated deal, nor that it provides just “bindingness” at the end of an exclusively politic al process. On the contrary, the law imposes upon states material and procedural right s and duties that limit states’ unfetter ed sovereignty to do as they alone wish with the part of an international watercourse that falls with in their territory. International water law is designed in a way as to lead to mutually acceptable solutions in situations of conflicting interests and even to bring about cooperation in a number of ways.

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