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One Health Surveillance Highlights Circulation of Viruses with Zoonotic Potential in Bats, Pigs, and Humans in Viet Nam









Latinne, A.; Nga, N.T.T.; Long, N.V.; Ngoc, P.T.B.; Thuy, H.B.; PREDICT Consortium; Long, N.V.; Long, P.T.; Phuong, N.T.; Quang, L.T.V.; et al. One Health Surveillance Highlights Circulation of Viruses with Zoonotic Potential in Bats, Pigs, and Humans in Viet Nam. Viruses 2023, 15, 790. https://doi.org/ 10.3390/v15030790


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