Thumbnail Image

Rift Valley Fever (RVF) - Outbreak investigation









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Preparation of Rift Valley fever (RVF) contingency plans (2003) 2002
    Also available in:

    Emergency preparedness and contingency planning are key elements for the early detection and control of disease outbreaks of a transboundary nature. While FAO Animal Health Manual No. 6 provides general principles regarding the setting up of emergency preparedness plans, this manula provides information on the nature of Rift Valley fever (RVF), and the principles of, and strategic options for, the prevention and control of RVF. It provides guidelines for individual countires that are threatened by RVF to formulate their overall national policy on control and eradication of a possible incursion of the disease. The manual identifies personnel as well as equipment and other facilities that are needed in a national RVF contingency plan. An outline of the suggested format and contents of a national RVF contingency plan is also provided as a guide and should be modified to suit the needs of, and circumstances that exist in, individual countries.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Real-time monitoring and forecasting of Rift Valley fever in Africa 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne disease that severely impacts livelihoods, national and international markets, and human health. RVF is currently limited to Africa and parts of the Near East but has the recognized potential to expand globally. The disease in livestock is spread primarily by mosquitoes and the movement of animals. Clinical disease has been observed in sheep, goats, cattle, buffaloes, camels and humans. RVF is zoonotic. It can result in widespread febrile illness in humans, associated with severe and sometimes fatal sequelae in under one percent of cases. Outbreaks of RVF are closely associated with climate anomalies such as periods of heavy rains and prolonged flooding, which increase habitat suitability for vector populations, thus influencing the risk of disease emergence, transmission and spread. In this context, Early Warning Systems represent an essential tool providing information on occurring animal health hazards that might evolve into disasters unless early response is undertaken. To enable national authorities to implement measures preventing outbreaks, FAO developed the RVF Monitoring/Early Warning System. This tool has been crucial to successfully forecast hotspots for RVF vector amplification, providing recommendations and early warning messages for countries at risk of RVF outbreaks.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Rift Valley Fever in Niger: Rapid Risk Assessment Report 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Since early August 2016, several human cases of Rift Valley fever (RVF), including some deaths, have been notified in Niger. According to the field investigations an increased mortality and abortions in small ruminants, cattle and camels have been observed. The impact of this outbreak on public health and animal husbandry of the affected area is considered serious. In addition, the risk of transboundary spread is arising a great concern in international organizations. Given the severe epidemiolo gical situation in Niger, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), in consultation with international external experts, prepared a rapid qualitative risk assessment in order to evaluate the impact of this RVF outbreak in Niger in animal production and human health and to estimate the risks of short and medium term spread of the infection to the neighbouring countries. The developed rapid risk assessment is based on the information available until the 14th of October 20 16.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.