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SEAGA Livestock Guide

Planning with a Gender and HIV/AIDS Lens







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    Project
    Integrating Livestock into Agricultural Statistics
    The AU-IBAR, FAO, ILRI, WB Data Innovation Project; Joint paper of the World Bank, FAO, AU-IBAR, ILRI with support from the Gates Foundation
    2010
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    The growing demand for food of animal origin developing countries, stimulated by population growth, gains in real per capita income and urbanization, represents an opportunity for some livestock dependent poor to escape poverty. However, because of the dearth of livestock-related data, the linkages between livestock, economic development and poverty reduction remain to a large extent unclear, which constrains the design, implementation and monitoring of pro-poor livestockrelated polici es and investments. This paper provides an introduction to the Gates-funded Livestock in Africa: Improving Data for Better Policies Project being implemented by AU-IBAR, FAO, ILRI and WB. This project has the overarching objective to assist African governments in better collecting and analyzing data which support public and private investments in the livestock sector that benefit the less well-to-do. A variety of livestock-related data can be collected at country level, but the current limited understanding of the livestock-poverty interface makes it difficult to identify priority data to gather and process for formulating policies and investments which promote equitable growth of the livestock sector. In addition, the role and mandate of the public sector in providing specific information is often unclear, and stakeholders tend to look for data and indicators which support specific investments or government objectives – such as, for example, the number of livestock to be vaccinated or prices for live animals in major regional markets – often disregarding the broader livestock-poverty interface. There are also technical difficulties associated with ‘measuring livestock’, due to the existence of hundreds of breeds; regular and irregular herd mortality and reproduction rate; livestock movements; impact of livestock age and animal diseases on productivity; and others.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Agricultural Censuses and Gender
    Lessons learned in Africa
    2005
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    This document highlights lessons learned in Africa with regard to the integration of gender concerns into agricultural censuses and provides recommendations on how to further improve the integration of these concerns into agricultural data collection systems. Past policies for agricultural development often focused on production grow th w hile overlooking the importance of human resources, as well as the social and w elfare aspects of agricultural development. By the late 1980s this st arted changing as more evidence became available of the importance of human capital to sustainable agricultural development. Moreover, users and producers of agricultural statistics increasingly noted that agricultural statistics all too often did not reflect the actual roles and responsibilities of women in agricultural production. This led to a first increase in demand for the production of accurate and up-to-date socio-economic and gender-disaggregated data through agricultural cens uses and surveys for the planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of agricultural development policies and programmes geared tow ards the sustainable development of the agricultural sector.
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    Document
    Fact sheet: Lebanon - Women, agriculture and rural development 1995
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    Due to the lack of gender-disaggregated data, and the fact that the last census carried out in Lebanon was in 1970, it is difficult to give accurate information on the role of women in agriculture. According to United Nations projections, women comprised 40.7% of the agricultural labour force in 1990. However, rural women have had to become the main contributors to agricultural production, from planting to marketing, due both to extensive male migration to urban areas and to increasing widow hood as a result of war. More than 10% of rural households were headed by women in 1987. Most women work on family farms, although a considerable number work as seasonal daily paid labourers, particularly in harvesting, where their wages are only half those of men. Women are also employed as cheap labour in food processing industries.

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