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Regional Implementation Plan for the Asian Soil Partnership. December 2016









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    Meeting
    Report of the Third Asian Soil Partnership Workshop "Towards a Regional Implementation Plan for Asia". Bangkok, Thailand, 14-16 December 2016 2016
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    Asia is the Earth’s largest and most populous continent of the world, located primarily in the eastern and northern hemispheres. With approximately 3.9 billion people, the population density of the region is as high as 1.87 person ha-1, which is much higher than the world average of 0.54 person ha-1. Recognizing the risk for soil degradation in the region, the Bangkok Communique (May 2015) reported that soil degradation due to soil erosion (onsite and offsite effect), soil pollution, soil organi c matter and carbon depletion, soil sealing/capping, soil compaction, and soil acidity, salinity and alkalinity, is negatively affecting food production and associated food security, national economies, provision of ecosystem services, adaptation to climate change, and increasing poverty. The situation is being aggravated by climate change and unsustainable soil management practices partially resulting from the rapid economic development and urbanization characterizing some countries in the regi on. In order to preserve and increase soil health, and stop and revert soil degradation, the following priorities were identified: - Promotion of sustainable soil management (SSM) practices at all levels and in all land use types; - Restoration/rehabilitation of degraded soils with focus on soil erosion, nutrient imbalance, soil acidification, soil salinity and alkalinity, soil pollution, and loss of organic carbon; and - Enhancement of soil information by using state of the art methods of dig ital soil mapping and advocating for having national soil information systems. Addressing these priorities encompasses various aspects falling into the Five Pillars of Action of the Global Soil Partnership (GSP). At this regard, this implementation plan identifies outcomes and activities per each pillar, which are considered priority in this first phase of establishing the Asian Soil Partnership (ASP). It is envisaged that funding for these activities will be secured by capitalizing on existing in-country initiatives and activities, as well as by actively sourcing additional external funding.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Status of the World's Soil Resources - Technical Summary 2015
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    This document presents a summary of the first Status of the World’s Soil Resources report, the goal of which is to make clear the essential connections between human well-being and the soil. The report provides a benchmark against which our collective progress to conserve this essential resource can be measured. The report synthesizes the work of some 200 soil scientists from 60 countries. It provides a global perspective on the current state of the soil, its role in providing ecosystem services, and the threats to its continued contribution to these services. The specific threats considered in the report are soil erosion, compaction, acidification, contamination, sealing, salinization, waterlogging, nutrient imbalance (e.g. both nutrient deficiency and nutrient excess), and losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and of biodiversity.

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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Soils, where food begins: how can soils continue to sustain the growing need for food production in the current fertilizer crisis?
    ITPS Soil Letters #6
    2023
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    Soils are directly and indirectly involved in the provision of most ecosystem services vital for humans, including food production, which is fundamental for food security and sovereignty. Soils are the basis for producing more than 95 percent of our food. However, one-third of the world’s soils are degraded to some extent due to erosion, loss of organic carbon and biodiversity, salinization, acidification, compaction, and nutrient imbalance, among other causes. This ITPS Soil Letters reflects on the close link between soil degrading processes and fertility loss and proposes a portfolio of solutions focused on soil health with the ultimate goal of achieving food security.

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