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Rift Valley Fever in Niger: Rapid Risk Assessment Report











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    Book (series)
    Rift Valley fever action framework 2022
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    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arboviral disease affecting humans and livestock transmitted by mosquitoes. It is endemic to large areas of Africa, resulting in widespread abortion and neonatal mortality in livestock, and severe complications in a small but significant percentage of human cases. The range of RVF is largely determined by the distribution of suitable vector habitat and rainfall, which changes over time and as a result of climate change. In addition to which, the movement of animals and animal products for trade may lead to the spread of RVF to previously non-infected areas. This RVF Action Framework is intended to provide decision makers with guidance on the best course of action to take in response to an RVF outbreak or the risk of an outbreak, and help them develop a national action plan for this response. A coordinated One Health approach that brings together the public, animal and environmental health sectors is recommended, as is a risk-based approach that uses risk assessment and mapping to determine the appropriate measures to be taken and the locations where they are required. A country’s RVF response can be best broken down into the four phases of the epidemiological cycle: the inter-epidemic, pre-epidemic, epidemic and post-epidemic periods. Surveillance, risk assessment and capacity building, for instance, are key during the inter-epidemic period, while the focus during the post-epidemic period shifts to mitigating the disease’s impact.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Real-time monitoring and forecasting of Rift Valley fever in Africa 2019
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    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne disease that severely impacts livelihoods, national and international markets, and human health. RVF is currently limited to Africa and parts of the Near East but has the recognized potential to expand globally. The disease in livestock is spread primarily by mosquitoes and the movement of animals. Clinical disease has been observed in sheep, goats, cattle, buffaloes, camels and humans. RVF is zoonotic. It can result in widespread febrile illness in humans, associated with severe and sometimes fatal sequelae in under one percent of cases. Outbreaks of RVF are closely associated with climate anomalies such as periods of heavy rains and prolonged flooding, which increase habitat suitability for vector populations, thus influencing the risk of disease emergence, transmission and spread. In this context, Early Warning Systems represent an essential tool providing information on occurring animal health hazards that might evolve into disasters unless early response is undertaken. To enable national authorities to implement measures preventing outbreaks, FAO developed the RVF Monitoring/Early Warning System. This tool has been crucial to successfully forecast hotspots for RVF vector amplification, providing recommendations and early warning messages for countries at risk of RVF outbreaks.
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    Book (series)
    Rift Valley fever surveillance
    FAO Animal Production and Health Manual No. 21.
    2018
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    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus, a mosquito-borne zoonotic agent, causes haemorrhagic fever in humans, and abortion and neonatal death in livestock. Outbreaks have caused national meat markets to collapse and have in the past caused regional trade embargoes. The geography of infection and clinical disease is expanding. Climate change is expected to accelerate this spread. The known geographic range of the virus is already larger than the areas where clinical disease has been observed. Effective surveillance is essential to mitigate the impact of RVF on lives, livelihoods and national economies. The RVF Surveillance Manual provides risk-based guidance for designing, planning and implementing effective participatory and syndromic surveillance. It builds on approaches outlined in the OIE Guide to Terrestrial Animal Health Surveillance and the RVF Decision Support Framework. It shows you how to tailor this guidance to the epidemiological needs of individual countries, starting with setting appropriate objectives. RVF surveillance objectives need to be in line with the country’s risk category and economic goals. Selecting the most appropriate indicators and methods for the situation follows easily from these goals and objectives. The manual is not prescriptive. Instead, it suggests questions to help you build a timely and sensitive surveillance system suited to national objectives and resources

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