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Potential conflicts between agricultural trade rules and climate change treaty commitments.

The State of Agricultural Commodity Markets (SOCO) 2018: Background paper











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    Project
    Addressing the 2030 Agenda on Climate Change and Food Security through Climate-Smart Agriculture - TCP/RAS/3604 2020
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    Asia is a dynamic region for agricultural innovation. For decades, farmers have combined traditional practices and local knowledge with modern agricultural techniques, providing a strong foundation for “Climate-smart Agriculture (CSA)” approaches. CSA encompasses a range of established methodologies and technical approaches to address interlinked challenges in the agriculture and land-use sector: meeting demand for food, reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the global food system, and building the resilience of agricultural systems to the impacts of climate change. These priorities are also reflected in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) submitted by countries under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change as part of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). While instruments such as the Green Climate Fund (GCF), the Global Environmental Fund (GEF) and various mechanisms under multi-lateral development agencies can support the implementation of NDC priorities, countries have yet to translate broad these into national programmes or investment pi,nes. The potential of CSA approaches to enhance productivity and resilience, and to reduce emissions has been widely documented. However, efforts to systematically and rigorously integrate climate change across CSA’s three pillars are relatively untested in the region. The aim of the project was to support governments in six focus countries to develop national CSA programmes (and/or to integrate CSA priorities into existing plans and programmes), linking CSA investments to NDCs and global climate finance mechanisms, based on regional best practice and knowledge.
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    The charcoal transition 2017
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    Charcoal is widely used for cooking and heating in developing countries. The consumption of charcoal has been at high level and the demand may keep growing over the next decades, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Some preliminary studies indicate that among commonly used cooking fuels, unsustainably produced charcoal can be the most greenhouse gas intensive fuels and simple measures could deliver high GHG mitigation benefits. Through the Paris Agreement on climate change adopted in 2015, count ries set themselves ambitious targets to curb climate change, and forest-related measures have an important role to play in climate change mitigation and adaptation. Over 70% of the countries who have submitted their (intended) nationally determined contributions (NDCs) mention forestry and land use mitigation measures. Despite the importance of woodfuel in many countries, few have explicitly included measures to reduce emissions from woodfuel production and consumption. Many of the NDCs that in clude forestry do not yet provide detailed information on how mitigation is to be achieved. The overall objective of the publication is to provide data and information to allow for informed decision-making on the contribution sustainable charcoal production and consumption can make to climate change mitigation. More specifically, the publication aims to answer the following questions: - What are the climate change impacts of the current practices on charcoal production and consumption worldwide and across regions? - What is the potential of sustainable charcoal production in GHG emission reductions and how such potential can be achieved? - What are the key barriers to sustainable charcoal production and what actions are required to develop a climate-smart charcoal sector?
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Climate-smart agriculture and the Sustainable Development Goals
    Mapping interlinkages, synergies and trade-offs and guidelines for integrated implementation
    2019
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    The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets presents a universally accepted and comprehensive framework addressing all aspects and dimensions of sustainability. The integration of the climate-smart agriculture (CSA) approach with the implementation of the 2030 Agenda provides an opportunity to enhance the overall sustainability of CSA results and synergize CSA interventions with other sustainable development efforts. To achieve this integration, a clear understanding of how the CSA implementation process can engage with the 2030 Agenda throughout the five CSA implementation steps is required. Moreover, the interlinkages between CSA objectives and the SDGs and associated targets need to be well understood – including both potential synergies and trade-offs. This publication presents an assessment and mapping of CSA-SDG interlinkages. These provide entry points for targeted CSA planning to enhance synergies and reduce potential trade-offs between CSA objectives and SDGs. The publication also provides guidelines for the integration of the CSA implementation steps with the 2030 Agenda. An important aspect of these guidelines is the integration with the Paris Agreement – and the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) pledged by countries – as a complementary process to the 2030 Agenda and the central reference point for countries’ commitments to climate action.

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