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Voluntary Standards for Sustainable Food Systems: Challenges and Opportunities

A Workshop of the FAO/UNEP Programme on Sustainable Food Systems









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    Book (series)
    Report of the 2016 Symposium on Technology Development and Sustainable Fisheries, Mérida, Mexico, 25–29 April 2016
    ICES–FAO Working Group on Fishing Technology and Fish Behaviour - FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Report No. 1182
    2019
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    The 2016 annual meeting of the ICES-FAO Working Group on Fishing Technology and Fish Behaviour (WGFTFB) was held from 25 to 29 April 2016 in Merida, Mexico. The meeting was hosted by FAO in close collaboration with the Universidad Marista de Mérida. More than 85 fishing technologists, scientists and other stakeholders, representing 23 countries from Europe, North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Asia, attended this meeting. This report summarizes the three-day symposium, on “Technology Development and Sustainable Fisheries”, which was part of the 2016 annual meeting of the ICES-FAO WGFTFB. The symposium comprised six thematic sessions: (i) challenges and advantages in static fishing gears; (ii) encouraging technological change in capture fisheries; (iii) energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction in capture fisheries; (iv) technology and practice for managing bycatch and reducing discards; (v) innovative technologies for observing fish and fishing gear; and (vi) fishing technology to eliminate vaquita bycatch from fisheries in the Upper Gulf of California (UGC). A summary of the ICES topic groups, country reports and a general business session can be found in the 2016 ICES Working Group report. Session 1, on “Challenges and advantages of static fishing gears”, featured research using a variety of static gears, including set nets, cod pots, pontoon traps and whelk traps. Most presentations focused on issues related to gear selectivity. In Session 2, on “Encouraging technical change in capture fisheries”, the presentations focused on various techniques to facilitate change, including the application of organizational change management theory and principles, the application of a risk assessment matrix, sustainability assessment tools, and industry-led gear testing programmes. In Session 3, on “Energy and greenhouse gas reduction in capture fisheries”, presenters focused on techniques used to measure energy consumption and associated remedial action, including energy audits and waste heat recovery from combustion processes. Session 4, on “Technology and practice for managing bycatch and reducing discards”, included presentations of research carried out on a variety of fishing gear types. The overarching theme of this session was the challenge of excluding or avoiding bycatch species without loss of the target catch. Session 5, on “Innovative technologies for observing fish and fishing gear”, provided a snapshot of initiatives to better understand fish behaviour in relation to the use of certain fishing gears and to evaluate fishing gear performance, particularly with the aim of reducing bycatch. Several new technologies were described as having the potential to contribute significantly to bycatch reduction. Session 6, on “Fishing technology to eliminate vaquita bycatch from fisheries in the Upper Gulf of California (UGC)”, featured several presentations describing initiatives to reduce the bycatch of vaquita and other marine mammals. This symposium provided an opportunity for fishing technologists and other experts from ICES member countries to exchange knowledge and ideas with contemporaries from around the world, especially from non-member countries in South America and Asia. A priority research subject that emerged from this symposium was to further reduce bycatch without loss of target catch. Greater efforts are required to understand fish behaviour. This will assist fishing technologists to develop more effective gears and technologies to reduce bycatch. Awareness raising and capacity building on new fishing gears and technologies that reduce bycatch and lead to more efficient fishing operations was considered essential to increase uptake and compliance with new fishing gears by fishers.
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    Meeting
    Near East Regional Assessment for the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land and Other Natural Resources 2010
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and several development partners are working together with countries to prepare Voluntary Guidelines that will provide practical guidance to states, civil society, the private sector, academic and research institutions, donors and development specialists on the responsible governance of tenure. By setting out principles and internationally accepted standards for responsible practices, the Voluntary Guidelines will provide a fram ework and point of reference that stakeholders can use when developing their own policies and actions. Regional consultations on the proposed Voluntary Guidelines are an important part of the process. They bring together regionally representative, multidisciplinary groups to assess regional priorities and issues that should be considered when the Voluntary Guidelines are drafted. The regional consultation for the Near East and North Africa was organized by Birzeit University, hosted by th e University of Jordan under the patronage of H.E. Mr. Ali El-Ghzawi, Minister of Municipal Affairs. The consultation was attended by 42 experts from 11 countries (Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, Morocco, Palestine, Sudan, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates) who brought a rich and extensive range of expertise derived from their experience in the public sector, private sector, civil society and academia. The workshop provided an opportunity for the participants to discuss their ideas and share their experiences which led to the formulation of common conclusions reflecting the region’s specificities and its related priorities.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Sustainable value chains for sustainable food systems 2016
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    The FAO/UNEP programme organized, in June 2016, a workshop on “Sustainable Value Chains for Sustainable Food Systems”. The sessions of the workshop examined the potential contributions of the organization, functioning and governance of food value chains with respect to the sustainability of food systems. It aimed to better frame the notion of “sustainable value chain”. The various interventions approached sustainability by diverse entry points, from environmental to social issues, at very divers e scales, from local markets to globally traded commodities. Most of them show practical solutions and good practices as well as the conditions for their implementation. This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the workshop, including a summary. It aims to stimulate reflection and exchanges among stakeholders and to facilitate the design of appropriate pathways towards more sustainable food chains, contributing to sustainable food systems.

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